The sweet sweet story

September 16, 2015

jesus is my savior

Redemption, propitiation, and reconciliation are the three main concepts used in the New Testament to describe the effects of the death of Christ. Several passages of Scripture establish the need for the first:

  1. Jn. 8:34—“Whosoever committeth sin is the servant of sin.” (AV)

  2. Rom. 7:14—“But I am of flesh, sold into bondage to sin.” (NASB)

  3. Rom. 6:17—the Romans “used to be slaves of sin.” (NIV)

 

We would be giving an incomplete picture of redemption in the New Testament if we left the believer at the point of his exit from slavery. For although he indeed steps from slavery to freedom in one sense, at the same time he enters into slavery again, but this time it is joyful service to the King of Kings. That freedom is underscored in Gal. 4:1–14. Paul points out that under the law a person could never keep God’s decrees (ch. 3). The law showed a person’s actions to be sin. No matter how hard he tried, he was proven over and over to fall short of keeping the law, and therefore to be sinful. In Gal. 4:3 Paul calls this bondage, or “slavery.”

But after the application of redemption an individual is no longer a servant to sin, but a child of God (4:7). The problem of bondage and work as a slave is taken care of. The believer is free from the law, which actually highlighted his service to sin. As a result he is no longer obligated to produce works of sin (which under the law everyone did at every point) but is now free to walk in the Spirit and able to produce righteous acts (Gal. 4:6; ch. 5).

Romans 6 takes us even further in our understanding of this freedom. Romans 7:5–6 shows how a Jew was held in the law, which worked in us to bring forth sin. We served sin (6:6) and the law (7:5–6). Romans 6:14–23 shows the new relationship to God, consisting of being servants to righteousness that leads to holiness. This is especially a great Pauline concept: four of Paul’s epistles begin with the statement that he is a bondslave of Christ.

The doctrine of redemption is also the basis for the Bible’s teaching on our physical surrender to God, as seen in 1 Cor. 6:19–20. Not only do our nonmaterial parts belong to God, but our bodies do also. For a believer overcome by some bodily sin, the most solid ground to proceed on is to trace what God has done in purchasing that person, body and all.

Finally, redemption has good works as its goal. Notice that we’ve come full circle here. Works under the law were of no avail. They only demonstrated our sinfulness. The sinner is redeemed from the law, from slavery to it and to sin, and is now a servant to God to perform a new kind of works!

Redeemed

Song by Big Daddy Weave

Seems like all I can see was the struggle Haunted by ghosts that lived in my past Bound up in shackles of all my failures Wondering how long is this gonna last Then You look at this prisoner and say to me “son stop fighting a fight that’s already been won”

I am redeemed, You set me free So I’ll shake off theses heavy chains Wipe away every stain now I’m not who I used to be I am redeemed

All my life I have been called unworthy Named by the voice of my shame and regret But when I hear You whisper, “Child lift up your head” I remember oh God, You’re not done with me yet

I don’t have to be the old man inside of me Cause his day is long dead and gone I’ve got a new name, a new life I’m not the same And a hope that will carry me home

Praise from Dickie T; at 36 years of age he saw his first miracle, today Dickie accepted the Lord as his personal savior. Pray for Dickie has he starts to church and his growing into further knowledge of God.

Prayer requests, counseling and comments, at scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: