A PIMPLE IS NOT SO SIMPLE

October 27, 2015

thinking over feeling

DEALING WITH A PIMPLE IS NOT SO SIMPLE

OUR 1000TH POST.

THIS IS FOR ALL THE TEENS AND ADULTS THAT SUFFER FROM ACNE, ROSCEA, ETC. IT’S BEEN WELL OVER 40 YEARS SINCE I WAS A TEENAGER BUT I REMEMBER MY FIRST ZIT, IT SHOWED UP JUST IN TIME FOR CLASS PICTURES. I THOUGHT IT WAS THE END OF THE WORLD.

What is the church doing to help teens navigate through puberty and young adulthood, I mean really helping, is it addressing all the topics important to teens, do they have a safe environment at church, will we listen and not rat them out?

One of my greatest success stories as a youth pastor was Carla, a wild child, drugs, sex, rebellion. Her parents attended the church for years. Her sister taught Sunday school. Her Brother taught Royal Rangers (Christian Boy Scouts).

Every Saturday I would go to the roller rink or the bowling alley and do something for the kids hanging out there. My wife always went with me and sometimes we would just hang around and listen, I always wore a clerical collar and took my guitar. Sometimes we just drove kids home that were to stoned or drunk to drive.

One day Carla called me and asked if I could take her to the doctors, she had gotten a venereal disease and crabs. We took her to the doctor and then drove her home, I didn’t see her for about a month and one day she showed up at my office. Her first question was why didn’t I turn her in to her parents. I told her I couldn’t re-virginize her and the pharmacy cured the rest, and if that was the worst thing that she ever did, I’d seen worse.

She went on to become the most dedicated Christian youth I’ve ever met, and then a missionary.

All because there was acceptance and trust.

Her parents eventually found out the whole story and called me to their house, I thought I was in for a butt chewing. But they cried and said thank you for rescuing their daughter.

Would I do it that way again, I’m not sure but looking back it meant one more person coming to know the Lord, so I guess I would.

AND NOW THE TWIST

The subject of our self-concept or self-image creates a kind of paradox. The Bible-believing Christian knows that he is a sinner, that in himself dwells no good thing, and that in himself he has no merit with God; yet, like a paradox, at the same time, he also knows, as a creation of God, created in God’s image and redeemed by His grace, he has value and purpose in life.

 

So how do we hit a proper balance? How do we avoid the self-centered approach and focus of the world and at the same time have a biblical concept of self, a proper viewpoint of our own value and purpose that sets us free to serve the living God, that sets us free from those thoughts and feelings that tie us in knots and ruin our personalities, create false agendas and motives that so people are incapacitated for ministry?

 

That we think properly about ourselves is important and is even commanded in Scripture. In Romans 12:3, the apostle wrote, “For by the grace given to me I say to every one of you not to think more highly of yourself than you ought to think, but to think with sober discernment, as God has distributed to each of you a measure of faith.”

 

The basic word for “think” in this passage is proneo, which means “think, form or hold an opinion, judge.” “Sober discernment,” is sophroneo, “be of sound mind.” It means “to be in one’s right mind, be reasonable, keep one’s head.” But first, the apostle warns us against thinking more highly of ourselves than we should.” The Greek word here is huperphroneo, “to think too highly of oneself, to be haughty.” Ironically, quite contrary to our society today, the apostle does not warn against thinking too little of ourselves. Regardless, the sound thinking Paul is calling for is grounded in biblical revelation and faith in the work of God for us in Christ. Paul is calling for thinking and personal evaluation based on the authority of God’s revelation and on the facts of God and His grace. It means we are to look at ourselves through the lenses of Scripture. (the inward defines the outward, not the other way around).

 

To Timothy, whom some expositors have nick named “Timid Tim” because he seems to have been having problems with his self-confidence (or confidence in God’s gifts and ministry for his life), Paul wrote in 2 Timothy 1:7, “For God has not given us a Spirit of timidity, but of power and love and discipline” (or sound-mind thinking). The Greek word for “discipline” here is related to the word used for thinking in Romans 12:3. It is sophronismos from sophron, “sensible, prudent.” It comes from sos, “safe, sound, and phren, “the heart, the mind, or the inner man.” Sophronismos refers to “control, self-discipline, prudence” that stems from right thinking. A controlled life, one that demonstrates self-discipline stems from soundness of mind, from knowing and acting on the truth of Scripture in the light of God’s grace in Christ. In both passages, Romans 12:3 and 2 Timothy 1:7, the context deals with God’s gifts to us and the bold expression of those gifts in loving ministry for the sake of the body of Christ.

 

Thinking properly about ourselves stems from right thinking about God, but then that extends to right thinking about others so that it results in a freedom to serve according to the grace of God.

So as we stared out this devotion, a pimple is not so simple.

God bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

God bless all our prayer warriors and all you that have kept up the comments, good, bad, different.

Peace Out, Learn it, Live it, Love it.

 

 

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