UPBEAT

September 23, 2016

Image result for picture of a music staff

ON MY IPOD THERE ARE OVER 1500 SONGS, EVERYTHING FROM JETHRO TULL TO BILL GAITHER, OZZY OSBORNE TO THE BLIND LEMON JOHNSON, CLASSICAL TO SMOOTH JAZZ, PUNK ROCKERS TO OPERA. MY POINT, GOD USES MUSIC TO BLESS, TO MOVE TO GIVE PAUSE FOR THOUGHT TO ENCOURAGE. SO HERE’S SOME THOUGHTS ON MUSIC. ROCK ON.

 

Bach Gave God the Glory

  1. S. Bach said, “All music should have no other end and aim than the glory of God and the soul’s refreshment; where this is not remembered there is no real music but only a devilish hubbub.” He headed his compositions: “J. J.” “Jesus Juva” which means “Jesus help me.” He ended them “S.D.G.” “Soli Dei gloria” which means “To God alone the glory.”

Theology and Music

Martin Luther said, “The devil takes flight at the sound of music, just as he does at the words of theology, and for this reason the prophets always combined theology and music, the teaching of truth and the chanting of Psalms and hymns.” “After theology, I give the highest place and greatest honor to music.”

THE MUSIC OF THE REST

There’s no music in a rest, but there is the making of music in it. In our whole life melody the music is broken off here and there by ‘rests,’ and we foolishly think we have come to the end of the tune. Not without design does God write the music of our lives. Be it ours to learn the tune, and not be dismayed at the ‘rests.’ They are not to be slurred over, not to be omitted, not to destroy the melody, not to change the keynote. If we sadly say to ourselves, ‘There is no music in a rest,’ let us not forget that there is the making of music in it.

THE LANGUAGE OF MUSIC

The status of music as a universal language offers an outstanding vehicle for the communication of any message, and more particularly, for the message of the eternal Gospel. Lawrence Bixler says that this universal language appeals first to the emotions and then to the intellect. The emotions serve as a doorway to the throne room of the mind.

ALL TOGETHER NOW

At a meeting of the American Psychological Association, Jack Lipton, a psychologist at Union College, and R. Scott Builione, a graduate student at Columbia University, presented their findings on how members of the various sections of 11 major symphony orchestra perceived each other. The percussionists were viewed as insensitive, unintelligent, and hard-of-hearing, yet fun-loving. String players were seen as arrogant, stuffy, and unathletic. The orchestra members overwhelmingly chose “loud” as the primary adjective to describe the brass players. Woodwind players seemed to be held in the highest esteem, described as quiet and meticulous, though a bit egotistical. Interesting findings, to say the least! With such widely divergent personalities and perceptions, how could an orchestra ever come together to make such wonderful music? The answer is simple: regardless of how those musicians view each other, they subordinate their feelings and biases to the leadership of the conductor. Under his guidance, they play beautiful music.

SO GET UPBEAT, GOD WILL PUT A SONG IN YOUR HEART.

GOD BLESS FROM SCUMLIKEUSCHURCH@GMAIL.COM

CONTINUE to remember Vickie J in prayer as she goes through cancer treatment.

Pray for “little joey” street punk who gave it up for Jesus on Wednesday

Tim p, marriage problems, she’s from a rich family and he’s from the other side of the tracks, they need to move and get away from her suffocating, nagging parents, (my words not his).

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