Among God’s characteristics, as he has revealed himself, none is more significant than his holiness (see Lev 11:44–45; 19:2; 20:7). The words holy and holiness occur more than 900 times in Scripture, and both the Old and New Testaments speak more about God’s holiness than any other attribute. Because of this characteristic God is not able to tolerate our sin. As Habakkuk 1:13 says: “Your eyes are too pure to look on evil; you cannot tolerate wrongdoing.”

 Christ does not just save us from our sin, though; he saves us so we can become holy (see Eph 1:3–4). And as Peter says, “Just as he who called you is holy, so be holy in all you do; for it is written: ‘Be holy, because I am holy’ ” (1Pe 1:15–16).

The Bible could not be any clearer, The reason for your entire salvation, the design behind your deliverance, the purpose for which God chose you in the first place is holiness.

 Holiness is associated with separation from the ordinary or the profane on the one hand and connection with God or the divine on the other. Holiness is not only being separated from sin and worldliness but being set apart for God’s purposes. Sanctification is the process by which we become holy.

  ➤ Make it your purpose—Of all the goals we might have for our lives, the most important is to pursue holiness, for it is God’s goal for us. As Oswald Chambers said,

  God has only one intended destiny for mankind—holiness. His only goal is to produce saints. God is not some eternal blessing-machine for people to use . . . He came to save us because He created us to be holy.

  If we love God, then we will commit to making holiness the primary purpose of our life.

 ➤ Don’t resist the Holy Spirit—Sanctification is by the Holy Spirit and is part of our conversion (see 1Pe 1:2). In this form, known as definitive sanctification, the Spirit sets us apart in Christ so we can be saved. The Spirit also works in us so we can be obedient to Christ, a process referred to as progressive sanctification because we are progressing toward holiness.

 In this latter sanctifying role, the Spirit (1) exposes our sin so we can recognize and turn away from it, (2) illuminates Scripture so we can understand its meaning and (3) helps us to see the glory of Christ. The Spirit is always willing to do this for us, which is why we must not “resist” (Ac 7:51) or “quench” (1Th 5:19) the Spirit.

 ➤ Commit to obedience—There is no holiness without obedience. As Peter hints at in verse 2, the Spirit’s sanctifying work is done so we can be obedient to Christ. As Jerry Bridges notes, “Obedience is the pathway to holiness.”

 ➤ Pursue Jesus, not moralism—As we become holy we will naturally become more moral. But that is not the goal of growing in godliness. Our pursuit is of Jesus, not moralism. “Holiness is not ultimately about living up to a moral standard,” says Kevin DeYoung. “It’s about living in Christ and living out of our real, vital union with him.”

 ➤ Expect improvement, not perfection—Too often Christians don’t strive to be holy because they consider it an impossible standard. But God is not leading us to an unattainable level of perfection, for someday when Christ appears we will be like Jesus (see 1Jn 3:2). Our lack of perfection in the meantime should remind us of our dependence on God and motivate us to continually strive to improve. John Calvin writes,

  As even the most perfect are always very far from coming up to the mark, we ought daily to strive more and more. And we ought to remember that we are not only told what our duty is, but that God also adds, “I am he who sanctifies you.” (Lev 20:8 ESV)

 

Remember Donovan P in your prayers, surgery on Friday

 

Keep Paul K, in prayer his up coming cancer surgery

 

Susie R, grieving widow, it’s been her first week after the death of her spouse of 55 years

 

Susan R, having ear surgery on her cochlear transplant

 

God bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

 

the old fashion truth

June 26, 2017

The old fashion secret (the alternate title)

“My grace is sufficient for thee; for My strength is made perfect in [your] weakness” (2 Cor. 12:9).

  In self we are crippled; in Christ we conquer. The secret is to face up to the former, and rest in the latter. The disadvantaged believer has all the advantage—he knows it must be “not I, but Christ.”

  “It is a great step when the believer fully consents to his own weakness, and the abiding consciousness of it, and so works faithfully on, fully assured that his Lord is working through him. He rejoices that the excellence of the power is of God, and not of us. Realizing his oneness with his Lord, he considers no longer his own weakness, but counts on the power of Him of whose hidden working within he is assured.

 It is this secret assurance that gives the believer a brightness to his look, and an assured firmness to his tone, and a perseverance to all his efforts, which of themselves are great means of influencing those he is seeking to win. He goes forth in the spirit of one to whom victory is assured; for this is the victory that overcometh, even our faith. He no longer counts it humility to say that God cannot bless his unworthy efforts. He claims and expects a blessing, because it is not he, but Christ in him, that worketh. The great secret of abiding in Christ is the deep conviction that we are nothing, and He is everything.

  “Not that we are sufficient of ourselves to think anything as of ourselves, but our sufficiency is of God”. (2 Cor. 3:5).

God bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

 

where ever we go

June 19, 2017

Every Where We Go

So, my son and daughter in law take me out to eat for Father’s Day. We go to their favorite restaurant, it’s packed, we have to wait, I decide to go to the men’s bathroom. While I’m standing there do my business, a young father comes in with his 3-4-year-old son.

The dad holds open a door to a stall and tells his son to sit there and go pee. The kid points to me and says; “no, dad, I want to go standing up like that guy.” The father says “you’re not tall enough.” A big frown drops on the kids face and he folds his arms and says very firmly “I’m big enough to stand and pee.”

The dad says “fine I’ll hold you up while you pee.” So the dad waits til his son drops he pants, waddles to the urinal; he picks up his son and the kid is not peeing. His father goes “come on Tommy pee.” And the kid while not looking at his father says in a most serious voice; “tell me you’re not going to drop me.” To which the father says to son as gently and as reassuring as possible; “son I will never let you go or drop you.”

And bingo, there’s our devotion, our Heavenly Fathers promises the same to us.

So where ever we go, we are sustained by the Father, wherever we go.

God bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

 

Scripture makes it clear that our eternal salvation comes by grace through faith; it does not come from ourselves but is wholly a gift of God (see Eph 2:8). So what does James mean when he asks, “What good is it, my brothers and sisters, if someone claims to have faith but has no deeds? Can such faith save them?” (Jas 2:14).

 James is saying a faith without accompanying works is no saving faith at all: “Faith by itself, if it is not accompanied by action, is dead” (v. 17). Is James contradicting Paul? No.

  Paul is describing true and living faith; James is arguing against a false faith which consists of nothing but spiritually dead intellectual assent (vv. 17, 19, 20, 26)

. . . Faith and good works are both necessary. But one is the root and the other is the fruit.

Not only is holiness the goal of your redemption, it is necessary for your redemption. And as John Piper adds, “All the obedience of believers necessary for final salvation is obedience that comes from faith (1Th 1:3; 2Th 1:11; Gal 5:6; Heb 10:35–36; 11:8). If it does not come from faith it is legalism and gains nothing but deeper condemnation (Ro 9:32).”

 Hundreds of verses in Scripture confirm that growing in holiness is necessary for our salvation. Because holiness is so important to spiritual formation—and for our eternal destiny!—let’s look at some of these verses (emphasis added):

  ➤ The necessity of holiness—“Make every effort to live in peace with everyone and to be holy; without holiness no one will see the Lord” (Heb 12:14).

 ➤ The necessity of doing good—“Do not be amazed at this, for a time is coming when all who are in their graves will hear his voice and come out—those who have done what is good will rise to live, and those who have done what is evil will rise to be condemned” (Jn 5:28–29).

 ➤ The necessity of obedience—“Whoever says, ‘I know him,’ but does not do what he commands is a liar, and the truth is not in that person” (1Jn 2:4).

 ➤ The necessity to forgive others—“But if you do not forgive others their sins, your Father will not forgive your sins” (Mt 6:15).

 ➤ The necessity of being free from the love of money—“No one can serve two masters. Either you will hate the one and love the other, or you will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve both God and money” (Mt 6:24).

 ➤ The necessity of love for God—“Do not love the world or anything in the world. If anyone loves the world, love for the Father is not in them” (1Jn 2:15).

 ➤ The necessity to love others—“We know that we have passed from death to life, because we love each other. Anyone who does not love remains in death” (1Jn 3:14).

 ➤ The necessity of being childlike—“Truly I tell you, unless you change and become like little children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven” (Mt 18:3).

 ➤ The necessity to bridle the tongue—“Those who consider themselves religious and yet do not keep a tight rein on their tongues deceive themselves, and their religion is worthless” (Jas 1:26).

 ➤ The necessity of perseverance—“Christ is faithful as the Son over God’s house. And we are his house, if indeed we hold firmly to our confidence and the hope in which we glory” (Heb 3:6).

 ➤ The necessity of walking in the light—“If we walk in the light, as he is in the light, we have fellowship with one another, and the blood of Jesus, his Son, purifies us from all sin” (1Jn 1:7).

 ➤ The necessity of repentance—“Repent, then, and turn to God, so that your sins may be wiped out, that times of refreshing may come from the Lord” (Ac 3:19).

  While this isn’t an exhaustive list of all relevant verses on the connection between sanctification and salvation, it’s enough to convey the importance Scripture places on the subject.

Blessings from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

 

decreasing to increase

June 9, 2017

  “Rooted and built up in Him, and established in the faith, as ye have been taught, abounding therein with thanksgiving” (Col. 2:7).

  At first our concern is to be used, to serve; but it is our concern. Then He begins to impress His concern upon our hearts, that we be like Him. Finally, it is His concern and ours that others may be reached by Him and established in Him.

The Holy Spirit indwells us and thereby accomplishes our sanctification—an adjustment of our personal lives to His own person and character, to the dropping away of sin’s power over us and the implanting of His Christ-imparting attributes in us. But to what purpose is all of this? For the beautifying of our personal lives? To terminate upon us? Not at all. His work in us is that He may have an instrument adjusted to His use, thus to work through us to the blessing of others.

It is not so much a matter of our attainments or full conformity to Christ, but rather our progressive movement towards the final goal. Even if we were perfect in ourselves, that would not make us ministers, for ministry consists in the Spirit’s manifesting in our lives something more of Christ that was not there before, and then making it shine out for the blessing and transformation of others.

  “And the Lord make you to increase and abound in love one toward another, and toward all men” (1 Thess. 3:12).

Remember Paul K in your prayers, upcoming cancer surgery

Pray for Dean, unsaved and battling alcoholism

Remember Joe R in your prayers for his shoulder

God bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

 

Sunday’s Coming

June 3, 2017

In the movie Man in the Moon, a young girl asks her mom why her dad goes to his “church” (fishing) every Sunday morning instead of attending worship services with the rest of the family. The mother replies, “When he asked my daddy if he could marry me, my daddy said only if he agreed to find the Lord. And he says it’s a lot easier finding the Lord out fishing than in any church he’s ever been in.”

 Many Christians take a similar view, thinking they can “find the Lord” better by spending time in nature or hanging out with friends than by worshiping in a church service. But the Bible is clear that as obedient Christians we are to not only regularly meet with fellow believers (see Heb 10:24–25), but we must also have confidence in the authority of church leaders (see Heb 13:17). Commenting on this passage, Derek Rishmawy says,

  The point is very simple. In the Bible, Christians are commanded to submit and listen to the elders and deacons (pastors, etc.) whose job it is to guide, guard, and love them. Well, if you’re not a member of a church that has those leaders, you can’t very well submit to them now can you? The implication is that everyone who has professed faith in Christ is also simultaneously a part of a local body of believers.

  Why would we shun what others cherish? In many parts of the world today Christians risk their lives to attend worship services. Spending many years visiting “church folk” that wouldn’t attend church it always amazed me that they all had the same excuse, something didn’t go their way. Few churches are actually growing today they just recycle grumpy Christians.

  I feel grieved and embarrassed wondering how Christians outside the contemporary West—Christians who walk a dozen miles to meet with their church, or who meet underground for a 10-hour service—would feel about the idea that sitting in an air-conditioned sanctuary for 90 minutes is just too difficult.

  While a person can be Christian and never step foot inside a church, Scripture makes it clear that to be obedient to Jesus and become more like him it is essential to consistently attend church.

Sunday’s coming, go to church

God bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

 

Summer is here, chill

June 1, 2017

I don’t remember where I first found this, but I have it written in my bible, and with summer here and all the fun it brings don’t forget to have some fun and enjoy living life to its fullest.

1.Sunshine is Refreshing…Fuel up your soul with a day rejoicing in God’s creation.  Take a few hours and spend time at a park experiencing the warmth and brightness of His love.  Find a bench and sit and bask in His sunshine as the warmth of His Son warms your heart.

2.Laughter is Contagious…Fuel up your soul with people who make you laugh.  Surround yourself with godly people who make you laugh and experience a fun-filled day.  Laughter is contagious and a good belly laugh each day helps rejuvenate your soul.

3.An Adventure is Exhilarating…Fuel up your soul with something you have never experienced before.  Take an adventure on your day off, such as kayaking, sailing, climbing, jet sky riding, or any other adventure that interests you.  First time adventures can be very enjoyable and exhilarating.

4.Music is Uplifting…Fuel up your soul with worship music that speaks to your heart.  Close the door of your office and listen to your favorite Christian musician.  Music can sooth the heart and calm your spirit.

5.Drawing is Fun…Fuel up your soul with a drawing that is inspired by how you are feeling.  Use pencil, crayons, markers, water colors, pastels, oils…whatever you desire and spend time expressing yourself on paper.  Expressing your thoughts on paper can be very energizing and a lot of fun. yes, real men can finger paint and do coloring books.

6.Walking is Energizing…Fuel up your soul with a short walk.  A short walk can give you energy that may be what is needed to complete your day without burn out.  Taking a short walk away from the office to reflect on God’s mercy and grace will power you up to press on to another day.

7.Readingis Stimulating…Fuel up your soul with a new book.  Reading on a biblical topic that interest you can fill you with new insights and new ideas.  Spending time in the evening reading instead of watching TV will improve your sleep.  Filling your mind with God’s word will calm your soul and allow you to wake up more rested and ready for another day with fresh new ideas.

8.Writing is Meaningful…Fuel up your soul with a poem or journal entries.  Write something about God asking Him to reveal Himself to you in a way He has never done before.  God will show up, touch your heart with His presence, take your words, and bring glory to His name.

9.A Friend is Calming…Fuel up your soul with lunch and a friend.  Close sincere godly friends have a way of calming your spirit and keeping you focused.  Friends are vital to pray with, cry with, and just hang out with.

10.A Vacation is Necessary…Fuel up your soul with rest.  A vacation is always necessary to recharge and rejuvenate your soul.  Make time and ask for time off. Turn off the computer and IPhone and enjoy your time away.  A vacation without distractions from church responsibilities will give you a new perspective and charge you with vitality.

“Rejoice in the Lord always. Again I say, rejoice!” Philippians 4:4  Be ready for fall, allow God to refresh and rejuvenate you this summer!

God bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

Remember Joe R, in your prayers for his shoulder

Doug B, and his broken back

Rick B, and the death of his mom

 

promise

May 27, 2017

God keeps his promises. That is a truth we discover throughout Scripture in his dealing with his people. The writer of Hebrews mentions Abraham to show the reliability of God’s promises: If God’s promises were reliable in the past—and if God’s nature is unchanging—then we have reason to trust he will keep the promises made to us (see Heb 6:16–18).

 Christians rely on God’s promises; we cannot, as some believers say, “claim a promise.” To claim a promise mistakenly implies we can take ownership of the promise. But God’s promises don’t work like that.

  A promise tells a little bit about who God is and what he will do. It is anchored in his holiness, goodness, power, and sovereignty. It is based on his omnipotence and omniscience. And it will come to pass in a way only God knows and ordains.

  Many promises in Scripture can be applied to believers. Here are 13 examples of the promises we can rely on God to keep:

  1. That the Father is always with you and will never forsake you (see Dt 31:8)

  2. That God will provide for your daily needs (see Mt 6:25–32)

  3. That Jesus will give your weary soul rest (see Mt 11:28–29)

  4. That you will have eternal life and never perish (see Jn 10:27–30)

  5. That you will forever have a constant Helper through the indwelling presence of the Holy Spirit (see Jn 14:16)

  6. That Jesus has prepared a dwelling place for you in his Father’s house (see Jn 14:1–3)

  7. That you were reconciled to God through the death of Jesus (see Ro 5:6–10)

  8. That if you confess your sins God will forgive you (see 1Jn 1:9)

  9. That if you ask anything according to his will, he hears you (see 1Jn 5:14–15)

  10. That God will comfort you in times of distress (see 1Co 1:3–4)

  11. That if you ask, God will give you wisdom (see Jas 1:5)

  12. That if you pray, God will give you peace and will guard your heart and your mind (see Php 4:6–7)

  13. That nothing will separate you from God’s love (see Ro 8:38–39).

There are over 2500 promises in the bible, a great study is to see to whom they apply, some are to individuals, some are to nations, some are to Jews only, some are for Christians only, some are even for sinners. Not every promise is for you, find out which ones are, “study to show yourself approved of handling the word of God.”

Blessings from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

 

BUT GOD!

May 19, 2017

Isaiah 55:1-3

English Standard Version (ESV)

The Compassion of the Lord

55 “Come, everyone who thirsts,
come to the waters;
and he who has no money,
come, buy and eat!
Come, buy wine and milk
without money and without price.
Why do you spend your money for that which is not bread,
and your labor for that which does not satisfy?
Listen diligently to me, and eat what is good,
and delight yourselves in rich food.
Incline your ear, and come to me;
hear, that your soul may live;
and I will make with you an everlasting covenant,
my steadfast, sure love for David.

55:1, 2 In ch. 55 the Lord issues a general call to all who would call themselves by His name, to abandon the Babylons of this world and to find their satisfaction and their security in Him alone, and in that city of joy and peace that He will build. This passage is a call to revival for all who have wandered far from the Lord or from that grace which is the basis for our relationship with Him.

The human condition, we chase after things that won’t satisfy, that don’t bring any lasting satisfaction.

 

 

I remembering counseling a guy one time that was dealing with sexual addiction. The reason he came in was he just had fulfilled his ultimate sex fantasy, and as he was leaving the apartment where this act had taken place he understood that in 10 minutes he was wondering what he would do to top that, and all of a sudden he realized the lust was still there; it hadn’t been satisfied at all.

Sin is like that, lust of the flesh, the eyes, the mind; drugs, booze, sex, shopping; it never ends.

 

But God.

 

One of the greatest sermons in the bible; “But God.”

 

Only He can give us satisfaction, rest, peace, and end to self-destruction.

Come all that are weary, and He will give you rest.

 

The first move is up to us, come, seek, then He does His part.

 

It’s your move

 

God bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

 

Pray for all those searching for a good church home

 

Only God can give real happiness and lasting joy, everything else is artificial.

 

DO THE HARD PART

May 16, 2017

There are no secrets and there is no easy path.

Do the work, get the reward, that’s the only answer.

When we read or hear the words of Scripture, do we “pay the most careful attention” (Heb 2:1)? How often have you noticed that by the end of the week, you’ve forgotten the Bible reading you did only a few days earlier?

 Too often we attempt to build a framework for scriptural knowledge without first gathering the lumber and cement needed to create a solid foundation. To lay that groundwork check out this simple four-step process that could transform your life by, quite literally, changing your mind:

  1. Choose a book of the Bible.

  2. Read it in its entirety.

  3. Repeat step #2, 20 times.

  4. Repeat this process for all books of the Bible.

  The benefits of following this process will become obvious. By fully immersing yourself in the text, you’ll come to truly know the text. You’ll deepen your understanding of each book, as well as your knowledge of the Bible as a whole.

 This method is adapted from the book How to Master the English Bible by James M. Gray, so we’ll let him explain the benefits in his own words:

  The first practical help I ever received in the mastery of the English Bible was from a layman . . . One day I ventured to ask him how he had become possessed of the experience, when he replied, “By reading the epistle to the Ephesians.” . . . He had gone into the country to spend the Sabbath with his family on one occasion, taking with him a pocket copy of Ephesians, and in the afternoon, going out into the woods and lying down under a tree, he began to read it; he read it through at a single reading, and finding his interest aroused, read it through again in the same way, and, his interest increasing, again and again. I think he added that he read it some twelve or fifteen times, “and when I arose to go into the house,” said he, “I was in possession of Ephesians, or better yet, it was in possession of me, and I had been ‘lifted up to sit together in heavenly places in Christ Jesus,’ in an experimental sense in which that had not been true in me before, and will never cease to be true in me again.”

  Here are three suggestions for putting this reading plan into practice:

  1. Choose shorter books—Because you’ll be reading an entire book of the Bible and not just a chapter or two, you’ll want to choose books you feel are manageable. You might want to start with a short book that has only a few chapters that can be read several times in one sitting. This will give you a sense of accomplishment and help develop the reading habit. For example, a short book like John or Jude can be read four or five times in one sitting, allowing you to finish the entire 20 readings in less than a week. And then you always have the option to work your way up to more extensive readings.

  2. Read at your normal pace—Treating the material reverently does not require reading at a slower than normal speed. Read for comprehension, ignoring the division of chapters and verses and considering each book as one coherent unit.

  3. Stick with the process—After the eighth or ninth reading you’ll hit a wall similar to what runners face in marathons. The text will become dry and lose its flavor. You’ll want to move on to the next book or abandon the program altogether. Stick with it. Persevere and you’ll discover the treasures that repeated readings can provide.

  Keep in mind that not every book will be equally rewarding. It doesn’t mean something is wrong with you if during one of your readings you find 2 John a bit redundant or Jude just plain boring. The Bible tells us “all Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching” (2Ti 3:16–17). Keep reading, and you’ll fully understand the truth of those verses.

The good news, it’s get easier and more exciting and more rewarding.

God bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com