New Dwelling Place

August 10, 2018

Resurrection-Doubting-Thomas

  “Being justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ” (Rom. 5:1).

  Few see and stand upon the fact that our history in Adam ended on the Cross. Our past will plague us until we acknowledge that we are now clear of Adam and safely hidden in the risen Lord Jesus—newly-born creations in Him. One of the penalties of self-occupation is self-pity and corroding remorse.

 Regret for a sinful past will remain until we truly believe that for us in the Lord Jesus that sinful past no longer exists. The man in Christ has only His past and that is perfect and acceptable to the Father. In the Lord Jesus he died, and in Him he rose, and he is now seated in Him within the circle of the Father’s favored ones. He is no longer angry with himself because he is no longer self-regarding, but Christ-regarding: hence there is no place for regret.

  The knowledge of our union with the Lord Jesus is what will deliver the believer from all that is low and feeble, and will lift him to a life of joy and peace. To gaze upon our risen Lord in the Father’s presence, to whom all things are subject, will transform us into heavenly Christians, dwelling all the day in the Father’s presence.

The believer shares the Lord Jesus’ Cross (‘knowing this, that our old man was crucified with him’ Rom. 6:6); His death (‘ye died and your life is hid with Christ in God’ Col. 3:3); His burial (‘we were buried with him by baptism into death’ Rom. 6:4); His resurrection (‘as Christ was raised up from the dead by the glory of the Father, even so we’ Rom. 6:4); His ascension (‘made us sit together in heavenly places in Christ Jesus’ Eph. 2:6).

  “There is, therefore, now no condemnation to them who are in Christ Jesus” (Rom. 8:1).

God bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

Pray for Annissa, she is HIV positive, tests just came back

Pray for Dave I, still battling prostate cancer

Pray for Andrea and Todd, really struggling with finances.

HANG ‘EM HIGH

August 4, 2018

Well despite what the current Pope says, the bible is still the final authority to believers, i.e. followers of Christ as Savior.

I left the links in so you can read all of these bible texts.

The Old Testament law commanded the death penalty for various acts: murder (Exodus 21:12), kidnapping (Exodus 21:16), bestiality (Exodus 22:19), adultery (Leviticus 20:10), homosexuality (Leviticus 20:13), being a false prophet (Deuteronomy 13:5), prostitution and rape (Deuteronomy 22:24), and several other crimes. However, God often showed mercy when the death penalty was due. David committed adultery and murder, yet God did not demand his life be taken (2 Samuel 11:1-514-172 Samuel 12:13). Ultimately, every sin we commit should result in the death penalty because the wages of sin is death (Romans 6:23). Thankfully, God demonstrates His love for us in not condemning us (Romans 5:8).

When the Pharisees brought a woman who was caught in the act of adultery to Jesus and asked Him if she should be stoned, Jesus replied, “If any one of you is without sin, let him be the first to throw a stone at her” (John 8:7). This should not be used to indicate that Jesus rejected capital punishment in all instances. Jesus was simply exposing the hypocrisy of the Pharisees. The Pharisees wanted to trick Jesus into breaking the Old Testament law; they did not truly care about the woman being stoned (where was the man who was caught in adultery?) God is the One who instituted capital punishment: “Whoever sheds man’s blood, by man his blood shall be shed, for in the image of God He made man” (Genesis 9:6). Jesus would support capital punishment in some instances. Jesus also demonstrated grace when capital punishment was due (John 8:1-11). The apostle Paul definitely recognized the power of the government to institute capital punishment where appropriate (Romans 13:1-7).

How should a Christian view the death penalty? First, we must remember that God has instituted capital punishment in His Word; therefore, it would be presumptuous of us to think that we could institute a higher standard. God has the highest standard of any being; He is perfect. This standard applies not only to us but to Himself. Therefore, He loves to an infinite degree, and He has mercy to an infinite degree. We also see that He has wrath to an infinite degree, and it is all maintained in a perfect balance.

Second, we must recognize that God has given government the authority to determine when capital punishment is due (Genesis 9:6Romans 13:1-7). It is unbiblical to claim that God opposes the death penalty in all instances. Christians should never rejoice when the death penalty is employed, but at the same time, Christians should not fight against the government’s right to execute the perpetrators of the most evil of crimes.

And it’s the same reason a Christian can go to war if the government calls on them. The authority God gives to your government makes you exempt. plus the commandment is read properly as; “thou shalt not murder”.

God bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

OUR FATHER’S MERCY

June 18, 2018

Our Father’s Mercy

  “I endure all things for the elect’s sake” (2 Tim. 2:10).

  Our Father’s mercy is all-encompassing. It includes our salvation—” . . . according to His mercy He saved us” (Titus 3:5); and our service—” . . . by the mercies of God, present your bodies a living sacrifice. . . which is your reasonable service” (Rom. 12:1).

  Reasonable service is based upon sacrifice: “I, Paul. . . rejoice in my sufferings for you, and fill up that which is behind of the afflictions of Christ in my flesh for His body’s sake, which is the church” (Col. 1:23, 24).

 To truly minister to others is always to accept new happiness and new distress, both of them forever deepening and entering into closer and more inseparable union with each other, the more profound and spiritual the ministry becomes. The one who gives himself to others can never be a wholly sad person; but no more can he be one of unclouded gladness.

  The fuller the service, the greater the surrender and sacrifice. It is not giving what one can spare without feeling it, for I will not offer the Lord ‘that which doth cost me nothing’ (2 Sam. 24:24).

  “The service declares its virtue and aim by the suffering which is endured in rendering it, for what can be done at one’s ease is generally done without much concern for the one to whom it is rendered, and thus the true quality is lost.”

  “I will very gladly spend and be spent for you; though the more abundantly I love you, the less I be loved” (2 Cor. 12:15).

God bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

Questions, comments, or prayer requests please send to the email.

 

June 17, 2018

not ashamed

When you became a Christian, you became an ambassador for a kingdom. You were given not only “Good News” to share with others but also one of the most powerful communication tools ever developed: the conversation.

 A conversation is simply a form of interactive, spontaneous communication between people who are following unspoken rules of discourse in an agreeable and polite manner. What makes starting conversations about the gospel so difficult is we assume one of society’s “unspoken rules” is to avoid talking about religion.

 Consider all the Christians you’ve met. Almost every one of them came to the faith because someone had a conversation with them about Jesus. Similarly, millions of people of other faiths are “spiritual, but not religious.” They, too, are likely to have an interest in discussing religion.

 In his encounter with the woman at the well, Jesus showed how a conversation could be a powerful tool for revealing himself and his kingdom. We can unlock the power of conversations about the gospel by applying the following:

  ➤ Be open—When he sat at the well, Jesus was likely tired and parched and in no mood to talk. But when he encountered the Samaritan woman he remembered his mission was to “finish the work” he had been sent by the Father to do (see Jn 4:34). Remembering our mission makes starting conversations easier.

 ➤ Be interested in people—People like to talk about what they know. And the one thing they know better than anything else is themselves. People aren’t necessarily being narcissistic for wanting to talk about themselves; they might just want to talk about what they know with someone who appears interested. We will be interested in others when we remember we are called to love and serve them.

 ➤ Ask questions, but don’t interrogate—Rattling off a series of questions can be intimidating. Instead, show genuine interest by asking people about themselves. Asking follow-up questions based on their responses to previous questions shows you are listening and are sincerely interested in their thoughts and ideas.

 ➤ Uncover their burden—At some point in a conversation, a person is likely to say what they do for work or relate an experience they are going through. A simple way to establish empathy and signal you truly care is to respond with some variation of “that sounds challenging.” Almost everyone believes the work they do is difficult or unappreciated or that their life is, at least in some ways, burdensome. If they open up about the challenges in their life, it provides a key way to open the door to spiritual matters.

 ➤ The “prayer ask” opening—If the person is willing to reveal a burden, ask if you can pray for them about it. When you ask, though, the reason should be because you are truly interested in interceding to God on their behalf. It’s not a “technique” to turn the conversation, though it can help you gauge a person’s interest in talking more about the gospel. If it seems appropriate, you can then follow-up with other questions, such as “Do you think much about spiritual things?” “Does faith play a significant role in your life?” “What is your concept of God?”

 ➤ Listen carefully to their responses—You don’t have to agree with them, but avoid trying to show why they are wrong. Show them you are interested in their views, opinions and concerns.

 ➤ The “reason I ask” approach—After broaching a spiritual topic and listening to a person’s answers, you can transition by saying “The reason I ask is because . . .” and then explain why you think it is important to talk about Jesus. This is your opportunity to share the gospel, though you might find it easier to begin by first briefly sharing your testimony. Remember, however, that your testimony is your “witness”—it is not the gospel. It would be a shame to open the door for a discussion about the gospel only to forget the most important part.

God bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

Pray for Matthew, 40 years old and is stressed and suffering from anxiety attacks.

Pray for Carl V, looking for a new job

Pray for Susan K, just graduated from high school and will be leaving home for college in a month and is freaking (a little).

BOW THE KNEE

June 14, 2018

BOW THE KNEE

You may think I live in a cave, but this is the first time I’ve ever heard this song. What a great song.

Ron Hamilton

What a privilege to come into God’s presence,
Just to linger with the One who set me free.
As I lift my eyes and see His awesome glory,
I remember who He is and bow the knee.

Bow the knee, bow the knee,
He is King of all the ages, bow the knee!
God alone on His throne,
See Him high and lifted up and bow the knee!
Kneel before Him, all adore Him.
As you live to love Him more, bow the knee.

In His hand He holds the power of creation.
With His voice He spoke, and all things came to be.
Yet He hears each simple prayer I bring before Him
When I humbly seek His face and bow the knee.

Bow the knee, bow the knee,
He is King of all the ages, bow the knee!
God alone on His throne,
See Him high and lifted up and bow the knee!
Kneel before Him, all adore Him.
As you live to love Him more, bow the knee.

  “Having therefore, brethren, boldness to enter into the holiest by the blood of Jesus” (Heb. 10:19).

  Personal knowledge of and fellowship with our risen Lord Jesus is counter-balanced by personal knowledge of and fellowship in the death of the Cross. The principle of balance prevents our slipping past the Cross and pushing into His presence.

  “Where do you dwell? ‘Come and see. They came. . . and abode with Him’ (John 1:39). The highest satisfaction He can have is that we should be at home with Himself. He has removed the distance from His own side.

  “If you believe that, you say, I will approach Him. That is one thing. The next thing is, His love is so great He delights to have your company. It is not that you will feel yourself out of place there—you will be there in all the beauty of the Lord Jesus Christ.”

Our Father delights in having us with Himself. Love yearns to satisfy itself about me. It is not only that I can go in, but a much greater thing—my Father, in all His majesty and glory, can come out! All is equipoised. Not only have I entree, but I am shaped to the grandeur of the scene, conformed to the glory of God. Not admitted like a stranger, but changed into the same image; not to equality but similarity; transformed into moral correspondence.

  “If we are not with Him where He is, we cannot be for Him where He is not. We must be inside the veil to be outside the camp.”

  “Let us draw near with a true heart in full assurance of faith” (Heb. 10:22).

 

SUPER POWERS

June 13, 2018

Enterprise_5_hr

  “Partakers of the divine nature, having escaped the corruption that is in the world” (2 Pet. 1:4).

  We are to find out in Romans 6, through the gracious teaching of the Spirit of truth, all that happened to the Lord Jesus there on the Cross. Then we will know our own position and standing, since we were judicially in Him there.

Have you ever thought about God’s thought about you, that you are ‘to be conformed to the image of His Son’? ‘It doth not yet appear what we shall be, but we know that, when He shall appear, we shall be like Him’ (Rom. 8:29; 1 John 3:2).

This cannot fail. The Lord Jesus presses on our hearts that He brings us into association with Himself. He ‘hath blessed us with all spiritual blessings in heavenly places in Christ Jesus’ (Eph. 1:3). He puts us in this position answering perfectly to His nature, and with a nature to enjoy it.

  “He imparts to us of Himself in order to qualify us for Himself.”

Not only is my blessing in heaven, but I need the Lord Jesus’ power to enable me to rise above the sense of my infirmity down here; for this world, instead of contributing to me, makes me feel my weakness and need, and that I must rise out of it to find and enjoy my blessing.

The very infirmity which this evil age makes me conscious of makes me draw upon the power of Christ, as the One outside it, passing into the heavens, so that I take pleasure in the very infirmity which is exposed here, that the power of Christ may rest upon me.

  “God forbid that I should glory, except in the Cross of our Lord Jesus Christ” (Gal. 6:14).

God bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

Praise from Anne, 42 days sober

Pray for Rachel, severe ear infection

Pray for Jay P, having knee surgery on Thursday

Cam, pray for this young mom and her battle with cancer.

Pray for Christina and Todd, spiritually curious, pray the right people come into their lives

S.O.S.

May 30, 2018

For some reason today, suicide was the hot topic. Not because everyone was watching 13 reasons why. But because the suicide rate is highest among seniors than any other age group.

For the Christian, it is essential to understand several things regarding suicide:

(1) Suicide is sin. God forbids murder (Exodus 20:13) and taking one’s own life is murder. It is also sin because it fails to take into account the assurances of God’s grace and mercy, of the compassionate High Priesthood of our Lord Jesus, and because it believes that there is no way out, but to sin. None of these are true. Taking one’s life is to disobey God, and disobedience is sin. Suicide is also sin because it causes great suffering for those we leave behind.  Suicide does not serve others for their good.

(2) While suicide is sin, it is not the unpardonable sin. (if the attempt fails) The only unpardonable sin is attributing the miraculous work of the Holy Spirit in Jesus to Satan (Mark 3:20-30).

(3) While suicide is sin, it is easier to understand why a Christian would consider suicide than it is to grasp why an unbeliever would do so.  At best, the unbeliever who commits suicide enters into an uncertain future.  Little do they know that the are actually entering into a state of eternal separation from from God.  Knowing the glorious future that awaits the Christian, a believer might reason that it is better to escape the trials and tribulations of this life and enter into eternal joy in the presence of our Lord.  This is not to understate how tragic this choice is, or how destructive it is to one’s testimony, and to one’s claim that God’s provisions are sufficient for our every need. But the Christian is assured of going to heaven when they die (even if that be by suicide). When one is overcome by depression and is not thinking clearly, suicide may appear to be the only way out.

(4) There were genuine believers in the Bible who wanted to die, men like Elijah and Job, but the Scriptures that describe these men’s despair and suicidal desires make it clear that they were wrong. Later events make it clear that “bailing out of life” would have been a very bad choice.

(5) God sometimes brings us to a point of total despair and frustration so that we will give up trying to live this life in our own strength and cast ourselves wholly upon Christ.

After decades of crisis counseling and standing with parents as their young teens were brought from the brink of death by a suicidal attempt. I’ve reached one opinion. Every single kid was glad they didn’t die.

Suicide is the most selfish thing a person can do, it reflects a person consumed only with their own feelings and thoughts. It doesn’t “solve” anything.

My advice is tell the secret, come out of the closet, share what’s going through your mind, tell your wife you got aids, from that 20 dollar hooker, do the prison time. Whatever. Just get over you being the most important person in the world.

On a happier note our bible winner was actually brother and sister from Ecuador. And since we had two matching bible and a great phone call with some new friends of scumlikeuschurch. We are happy to announce that Birdy and Lollei are now even bigger friends.

God bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

 

Living Guilt Free

May 14, 2018

Guilt is that awful feeling that hits us in the pit of the stomach when we know we have done wrong, and we’ll do almost anything to get rid of it. Adam and Eve, our first parents, established a human pattern that continues to this day. First comes the cover-up. Then we play the blame game as we try to justify or rationalize our actions. We think that the more we can blame someone else, the less guilty we will feel.

Sometimes we try to escape from guilt through activities, alcohol, or drugs. Or we run to psychiatrists—but secular psychiatry has tried to solve the problem of guilt by saying there is no such thing as sin. Just ignore that guilty feeling, we’re told, because it has no basis in reality. We try, but somehow we just can’t pull it off. Why not?

We can’t escape these feelings by ignoring them because God built into our natures a knowledge of right and wrong—a moral code. God’s Word speaks of the moral conscience, which exists even within those who are not aware of His laws.

One example of this is described in Romans 2:14-15: “When Gentiles, who do not have the law, do by nature things required by the law, they are a law for themselves, even though they do not have the law, since they show that the requirements of the law are written on their hearts, their consciences also bearing witness, and their thoughts now accusing, now even defending them.”

GOD GAVE US A CONSCIENCE TO MAKE US AWARE OF SIN

There has never been a civilization on earth that didn’t have laws—rules about right and wrong. Even though humankind hasn’t always worshiped the living God, the moral codes of every civilization prove that there is an objective authority who has set a standard. The human conscience is evidence of God’s existence and His standards for behavior.

God is the One we offend when we sin, and only He can provide a remedy for our sin and guilt. From the third chapter of Genesis on, He required animals to be sacrificed for human beings who wanted to have their sins forgiven. And the New Testament reminds us again, “Without the shedding of blood, there is no forgiveness” (Heb. 9:22).

But the blood of these thousands of animals could not remove sin. It only covered it, until the one perfect Sacrifice was made that completely satisfied the holiness and justice of God. When John the Baptist pointed to Jesus, he said in one sentence the purpose for His coming to earth: “Look, the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world” (John 1:29).

God’s Only Remedy for Sin and Guilt Is Jesus

Jesus came to earth to die. He was the Substitute for us—He took our punishment in our place so we could be forgiven and made right with God. But what we don’t always understand is that God also wants us to be free from guilt. We learn this from His Word.

GOD’S FORGIVENESS INCLUDES A CLEANSED CONSCIENCE

Through Christ, God has wiped our record clean. He wants us to know it, and to live in that freedom. We’re told, “How much more, then, will the blood of Christ, who through the eternal Spirit offered himself unblemished to God, cleanse our consciences from acts that lead to death, so that we may serve the living God!” (Heb. 9:14).

When believers in biblical times put their faith in Christ, they acted like forgiven and cleansed people. Zaccheus, described in Luke 19, is a classic example. Everyone knew Zaccheus was a sinner—he worked for Israel’s oppressor, the Roman government. In fact, Zaccheus was head of the equivalent to the Roman Internal Revenue Service. He levied the taxes Caesar required, and he was free to add whatever he wanted for himself.

When Jesus invited Himself to Zaccheus’s house, He demonstrated publicly that He even accepted sinners as terrible as Zaccheus was perceived to be. Zaccheus responded by putting his faith in Christ as his Messiah. But notice how he gave evidence of it: “Zaccheus stood up and said to the Lord, ‘Look, Lord! Here and now I give half of my possessions to the poor, and if I have cheated anybody out of anything, I will pay back four times the amount” (Luke 19:8).

Zaccheus repented—he changed his way of life. He promised to make generous restitution to those he had cheated. The change was dramatic. That’s why Jesus could say in response, “Today, salvation has come to this house.” Zaccheus’s new conduct was evidence of his new faith.

THROUGH CHRIST, SIN IS GONE FOREVER

The death and resurrection of Jesus Christ is God’s eternal remedy for human sin. When we trust Him, He not only forgives our sins, but He also cleanses our conscience of guilt. What happens to our sins? Once God has forgiven them, they are:

Out of sight: “You have put all my sins behind your back” (Isa. 38:17).

Out of mind: “For I will forgive their wickedness and will remember their sins no more” (Jer. 31:34).

Out of reach: “You will tread our sins underfoot and hurl all our iniquities into the depths of the sea” (Mic. 7:19).

Out of existence: “I, even I, am he who blots out your transgressions, for my own sake, and remembers your sins no more” (Isa. 43:25).

Our sins are gone, removed from existence as if they had never happened in the first place. We can start our new life with a clean slate. And God gives us His Holy Spirit to empower us with new strength.

Have you been trying to make it on your own? Perhaps you have done things that have filled you with guilt, and you think if you’re sorry enough and if you do enough good things, you can make up for the bad. No way!

GOD FORGIVES US BY GRACE THROUGH FAITH IN CHRIST

Scripture tells us we are washed clean and given new life through faith in Jesus Christ: “But when the kindness and love of God our Savior appeared, he saved us, not because of righteous things we had done, but because of His mercy. He saved us through the washing of rebirth and renewal by the Holy Spirit, whom he poured out on us generously through Jesus Christ our Savior” (Titus 3:4-6).

What wonderful words—kindness, love, and mercy! Have you trusted our kind and loving and merciful God alone to save you? If you haven’t, talk to Him in your heart and tell Him you’re through trying to earn your salvation. Trust in the Lord Jesus Christ alone for forgiveness, eternal life, and a cleansed conscience. There is no other way.

SIN DAMAGES OUR FELLOWSHIP WITH GOD

So now we understand what happens to our sin when we ask God for forgiveness—it vanishes! But most of us have to ask another question: What happens when we sin after we have trusted Christ? Can a believer, a child of God, lose his or her salvation? Do we have to be saved all over again? If all our sins—past, present, and future—are forgiven because of Christ’s death, why do we have to do anything at all?

The answer is this: When a believer sins, something happens that has to be dealt with. Our relationship with God cannot be broken, because we are His children by the new birth, but our fellowship with Him is damaged. Have you noticed that when you feel guilty because you’ve done something you know is wrong, you avoid praying or reading your Bible? You don’t feel like coming to church, and you may not even enjoy being with your Christian friends as much as usual. These feelings are evidence that your fellowship with God is broken.

Because He loves us, God wants our fellowship with Him to be restored. And He has provided a way for us to continue being cleansed from guilt for sins we commit after our salvation. The apostle John tells us how it’s done: “If we claim to be without sin, we deceive ourselves and the truth is not in us. If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just and will forgive us our sins and purify us from all unrighteousness” (1 John 1:8-9).

The trouble is, we often don’t follow God’s directions for our cure. Sometimes we wait a very long time before agreeing with God that we have sinned. All that time guilt eats its corrosive way into our conscience. David’s story, in the Old Testament, is an excellent example of this process.

The Story of David and Bathsheba

God spoke of David as a man after His own heart; He chose David to be king over Israel. From his teen years, David was devoted to God in an extraordinary way. He followed God’s ways. He listened to godly counsel. And when he was a fugitive from King Saul for at least ten years, he constantly found his refuge in God, who rescued him again and again. David was a deeply spiritual man with a well-developed emotional capacity. He was also a man with normal human passions.

He was about fifty years old when he committed the sins that affected him for the rest of his life. Today this is called “going through midlife crisis.” David saw another man’s wife and lusted for her. It didn’t matter that her husband was one of his trusted soldiers who was out on the battlefield fighting for him. David sent for Bathsheba and slept with her. Then, when she let David know she was pregnant, he ordered her husband Uriah to come home so he could sleep with her and thus make it look like the child was his. That didn’t work, so David instructed his commanding general to put Uriah on the front of the battle lines so he would be killed.

Uriah died in battle, and after Bathsheba had finished her mourning period, David married her. The cover-up was in place. But then we read these ominous words at the end of 2 Samuel 11: “But the thing David had done displeased the LORD.”

God knew all about David’s behavior, and He would not let His beloved servant get away with such a flagrant and heartless abuse of power. During the unfolding of the story, about a year went by from start to finish—a year during which David seemed to be without a conscience at all. Remember, David was a believer, a man after God’s own heart, a man to whom God had promised a lasting dynasty. His would be the royal line from which the Messiah would come. Didn’t he feel guilty for sins as wicked as adultery and murder? Yes, but he had stifled his conscience. He wouldn’t listen to the voice of the Holy Spirit. But he paid the price for his actions. Here’s how he described his experience: “When I kept silent, my bones wasted away through my groaning all day long. For day and night your hand was heavy upon me; my strength was sapped as in the heat of summer” (Ps. 32:3-4).

So God sent the prophet Nathan to waken David’s conscience with a story that appealed to his emotions. Nathan told him about a poor man who had only one little pet lamb, which he loved like a child. A rich man, who had many flocks of his own, stole this little lamb and made it into shish-kebabs for a dinner guest. Here’s how David reacted to Nathan’s story:

“David burned with anger against the man and said to Nathan, ‘As surely as the LORD lives, the man who did this deserves to die! He must pay for that lamb four times over, because he did such a thing” (2 Sam. 12:5-6).

Nathan looked into the face of his angry king who had just passed judgment on himself and said to David, “You are the man!”

How would David respond to the accusation and the punishment? He tells us his response in Psalm 32:5: “Then I acknowledged my sin to you and did not cover up my iniquity. I said, ‘I will confess my transgressions to the LORD—and you forgave the guilt of my sin!”

CONFESSION IS REQUIRED FOR GUILT TO BE REMOVED

David made no excuses; he blamed no one else. He said, “I have sinned against the Lord.”

You may be asking, What about his sin against Bathsheba and against Uriah? No, David saw his sin for what all sin is—an offense against the Lord. And he knew the punishment was just, because he knew the truth of this spiritual principle:

Forgiveness does not cancel out the natural consequences of our sins.

Nathan told David, “The LORD has taken away your sin. You are not going to die. But because by doing this you have made the enemies of the Loin show utter contempt, the son born to you will die” (2 Sam. 12:13).

The death of the child was just the beginning. David lived to see his son Amnon rape his half-sister, Tamar. Then David’s son Absalom killed Amnon and later tried to seize David’s throne, and he was also killed. In fact, from this time on, David’s life deteriorated until the day he died. His one act of unbridled passion permanently marked his family and his kingdom. But his fellowship with God was restored. After Nathan came to him, David wrote Psalm 51, which eloquently describes his sin, his repentance, and his forgiveness.

read Hebrews 9:14 to her: “How much more, then, will the blood of Christ, who through the eternal Spirit offered himself unblemished to God, cleanse our consciences from acts that lead to death, so that we may serve the living God!” (emphasis mine).

“we have to act with our wills to apply what God’s Word says. Then He will eventually take care of our emotions.”

We Need a Clean Conscience to Serve God

Hebrews 9:14 provides an interesting insight about the result of our cleansing and forgiveness. God does this, the writer of Hebrews explains, “that we may serve the living God.”

Guilt keeps us from serving God. Yet God can even use the sins we have committed to make us more effective in our work for Him. Only when we refuse God’s provision for forgiveness, for cleansing, and for a new beginning are we incapacitated by our past sins. That’s why it is important for us to remember:

Satan wants us to be immobilized by guilt.

We have an enemy whose main purpose is to keep us from serving the Lord. In Scripture he is called the “accuser” of believers. If you continue to feel guilty for forgiven sins, you are hearing the voice of the enemy, not the Holy Spirit. Satan is a liar. Reject the fiery darts he shoots at your mind by holding up the shield of faith in the finished work of your Savior, and the devil will flee from you.

If guilt is the obstacle that has kept you from growing in your spiritual life, won’t you lay down your burden at the cross? Accept God’s forgiveness. Let Him cleanse your conscience. And commit yourself to living in obedience to God’s Word and to the guidance of the Holy Spirit, who lives within you. Your burden of guilt will be lifted—once and for all.

With God there is always a way back, we just have to accept it.

Come on, give up the guilt and shame, no matter what you have done God is willing to forgive you, just the fact that you are thinking about God and wanting forgiveness is the first step.

God bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

 

Holy, Holy, Holy

May 5, 2018

Within the Pentateuch, the first five books of the Bible, no object is mentioned in more verses than the tabernacle. A significant portion of the book of Exodus—the entirety of 25:1–31:18 and 35:1–40:38—deals with the tabernacle, its furnishings, its priesthood and related issues. Next to the exodus itself and the revelation of the law, the tabernacle forms the third great theme in the book.

 Why do the books of Moses put so much emphasis on and give so much attention to the tabernacle? Because it is a symbol of the Messiah and his salvation.

  The earthly tabernacle was a copy or a shadow of the true dwelling place of God in heaven (Heb 8:5; 9:24). It showed what God was like and what was needed to deal with sin. In this way it symbolized what the Messiah was to do for our salvation. We may say that it “foreshadowed” the Messiah and his work. It was like a shadow of the Messiah cast backward in time into the Old Testament period.

  As travelers in a desert region, the Israelites lived a nomadic life and dwelled in tents. So when God came to dwell among them he had the people make a sanctuary in the form of a tent (see Ex 25:8). The tabernacle foreshadowed the fact that Christ would become incarnate and dwell among us. As the Gospel of John says, ‘The Word became flesh and made his dwelling among us’ (1:14.)

 Many of the elements within the tabernacle also prefigured Christ.

Here are two:

  1. Jesus as the entrance—The courtyard to the tabernacle could only be accessed through one entrance (see Ex 27:16), foreshadowing how Jesus was the “gate” through which we enter to find salvation (see Jn 10:9).

  2. Jesus as the light—The tabernacle contained a lampstand of pure gold (see Ex 25:31) that served as the only light in the most holy of places and foreshadowed the “light of the world” (see Jn 12:46).

There many great books on the Tabernacle, some of the really older books are great for devotional material. And today’s modern books with great graphics are phenomenal.

Plus there are some great places to visit that have recreated the tabernacle or even a full size replica of Noah’s ark.

All are worth a visit.

God bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

 

  “Whosoever doth not bear his cross, and come after Me, cannot be My disciple” (Luke 14:27).

  One hears much today about “body life,” or the “social gospel” with its emphasis upon New Testament gathering, rather than Christ-centered growth. The Body is meant to manifest the Head, and that necessitates spiritual members. Many of our new day pastors’ are using bible wordage and not bible meaning.

Where there is no Cross there is no life, and no ministry of life. The object of suffering is that there may be a full and abundant ministry. . . . We are not to invite trouble, nor by austerity to ill-treat our bodies. The Holy Spirit Himself takes responsibility for our experience, leading us in paths where we encounter, in body, heart, or spirit, that measure of ‘the dying of Jesus’ that will mean enrichment of our ministry.

  “There are many today who seem to think that it is all or largely a matter of the order, technique, and form, and if we are to return to the ‘New Testament’ form or order of churches all would be well. The fact is that, while certain things characterize the N.T. churches, the Word does not give us a complete pattern according to which churches are to be formed!

There is no blueprint for churches in the N.T., and to try to form such churches is only to create another system which may be as legal, sectarian and dead as others. Churches, like the Church, are organisms which spring out of life, which life itself springs out of the Cross of Christ wrought into the very being of believers. Unless believers are crucified people, there can be no true expression of the Church.

  “God forbid that I should glory, except in the Cross” (Gal. 6:14).

God bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com