BUT GOD!

May 19, 2017

Isaiah 55:1-3

English Standard Version (ESV)

The Compassion of the Lord

55 “Come, everyone who thirsts,
come to the waters;
and he who has no money,
come, buy and eat!
Come, buy wine and milk
without money and without price.
Why do you spend your money for that which is not bread,
and your labor for that which does not satisfy?
Listen diligently to me, and eat what is good,
and delight yourselves in rich food.
Incline your ear, and come to me;
hear, that your soul may live;
and I will make with you an everlasting covenant,
my steadfast, sure love for David.

55:1, 2 In ch. 55 the Lord issues a general call to all who would call themselves by His name, to abandon the Babylons of this world and to find their satisfaction and their security in Him alone, and in that city of joy and peace that He will build. This passage is a call to revival for all who have wandered far from the Lord or from that grace which is the basis for our relationship with Him.

The human condition, we chase after things that won’t satisfy, that don’t bring any lasting satisfaction.

 

 

I remembering counseling a guy one time that was dealing with sexual addiction. The reason he came in was he just had fulfilled his ultimate sex fantasy, and as he was leaving the apartment where this act had taken place he understood that in 10 minutes he was wondering what he would do to top that, and all of a sudden he realized the lust was still there; it hadn’t been satisfied at all.

Sin is like that, lust of the flesh, the eyes, the mind; drugs, booze, sex, shopping; it never ends.

 

But God.

 

One of the greatest sermons in the bible; “But God.”

 

Only He can give us satisfaction, rest, peace, and end to self-destruction.

Come all that are weary, and He will give you rest.

 

The first move is up to us, come, seek, then He does His part.

 

It’s your move

 

God bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

 

Pray for all those searching for a good church home

 

Only God can give real happiness and lasting joy, everything else is artificial.

 

TALK THE WALK

March 25, 2017

When I was preaching through Genesis a man told me that he had become excited about being involved in church after many years’ absence. When I asked what had made the difference he said, “I love Genesis!” I was surprised and asked, “What do you like about it?” and he replied, “I like the stories about all those guys like Abram and Jacob because they’re all worse than me and it makes me feel so good!” I agreed with him that Abram was not perfect but he was a man of faith, and that we should not gloat over his failures but learn from his mistakes and emulate his strong dependence on the faithful God. You’ll be glad to know that my friend eventually came to call on Abram’s God.

How’s your walk?

No, this is not a commercial for some sort of cushioned insoles for your shoes. The real question is, rather, how is your walk with the Lord?

In Scripture, “walk” is often the term figuratively referring to a person’s conduct or way or life. One of the highest compliments the Bible gives anyone is that they “walked with God.” That’s what was said about Enoch in Genesis 5:24. It so pleased God that, according to some Bible scholars, Enoch never tasted death – he was raptured to heaven by God (“…God took him”).

Paul says that Christians should “walk not according to the flesh but according to the Spirit” (Romans 8:4). John tells us we should “walk” in the light, which is Christ (1 John 1:7).

Why is such a “walk” important? Well, as Christians we certainly are to live in such a way that glorifies God. It’s how we should live our lives — honoring God in all that we do and in our relationships and interaction with others. How we do that is our “walk” as Christians.

But not only does it benefit us personally to live for Christ – according to His precepts – it is also extremely important regarding our witness to others. After all, that’s why Christ leaves us here on earth after we accept Him – to be a witness to others who haven’t found Him yet. That’s why we should – must – tell others about Christ. Yes, with words. (Romans 10:14.) But sometimes the first thing someone notices about us is not what we’re saying, but, rather, how we’re living.

One of the world’s biggest objections to Christianity is that Christians “are all hypocrites” who don’t live what they preach. “They all have a ‘holier-than-thou attitude’ and yet they live like everybody else – lying, cheating, living selfishly, etc., etc., etc.”

If our words about Christ are to have any credibility whatsoever, our lives, our actions, our “walk” must totally reflect what we’re saying. Our walk must show that we truly believe what Christ taught. Your “walk” … must “talk!”

That’s the theme of a song written by Rodney Griffin and Babbie Mason called “Your Walk Talks,” recently recorded by the Mark Trammell Quartet. Here’s how the song* says it:

        You know, your walk talks, and your talk talks

        But your walk talks louder than your talk talks

        Your behavior toward your neighbor

        Is really how you feel about the Savior

        When you exemplify and shine the Light of Christ

        You know the number in the kingdom will be multiplied

        Yes, your walk talks, and your talk talks,

        But your walk talks louder than your talk talks.

How you live your life – your “walk” – speaks more loudly and clearly to others than anything you would say verbally (as important and indispensable as that is). Have you thought about that line in the song – “Your behavior toward your neighbor is really how you feel about the Savior?” That can be convicting. If you profess to love Christ, you should do what He taught – love your neighbor.

        What did you do today to give your love away

        To a lost and hurting soul?

        Did you lend a hand to a fellow man

        And help him on down the road?

        When you illuminate it takes the dark away

        So let your little light shine

        When we follow through with what we say and do

        The Father will be glorified.

I think sometimes the world is surprised when a Christian actually does live like Christ. It baffles them because it’s not, unfortunately, what they’ve been conditioned by the world to expect. And that contrast – between expectations and observed actions – can actually get their attention in a very positive way.

About the message of that song, “…the Bible says we are a ‘peculiar people’ if we truly walk the walk and talk the talk. And we are. I think that’s the greatest compliment to a child of God in the 21st century, for someone to say, ‘you’re just a little bit strange.’ You’re not supposed to love someone when they walk up and slap you in the face. You’re not supposed to turn the other cheek.”

There’s only one way a Christian can actually do that: “We all know that we can’t be what we need to be outside of the infiltration of the Holy Spirit into our lives [and] allowing Jesus to live through us. This song is a happy little way of reminding folks just how important our walk is and the fact that it does talk louder than what our lips say.”

So…. Does your “walk” talk? It is saying something to those around you. And, when your walk does talk, what does it say?

How strong is your faith?

How close is your walk?

Do people desire to know your God?

Walk the walk, talk the talk.

Blessings from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

 

holy prayers

February 17, 2017

praying mom

This is the third most asked question i

How can I learn to pray or how can I pray better

It just like sermon building, when you start with “Thus sayeth The Lord” its hard to go wrong, just like praying the Word of God, what you are doing is taking words that originated in the heart and mind of God and circulating them through your heart and mind back to God. By this means his words become the wings of your prayers.

 

You can’t go to far wrong with that. I say to far because you can take the verses our of context. That’s why good study bible like the “life application bible” will help you keep on track. Second I would add the one volume commentary by Matthew Henry. With those two resources you would be hard pressed to go the wrong way.

 

 

To pray the Bible, you simply go through the passage line by line, talking to God about whatever comes to mind as you read the text. See how easy that is? Anyone can do that.

 

 

And since faith comes from hearing the word of God, what better thing to do than read the bible out loud. So pray out loud, (it’s not just for Pentecostals you know).

pray about? Everything, right? The Bible tells us that in Philippians 4: 6: “Do not be anxious about anything, but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God.”

We may bring “everything by prayer” to God. Everything is something we may pray about. Every person, every object, every issue, every circumstance, every fear, every situation— everything in the universe is something we may bring before God. So every thought that enters your mind as you are reading a passage pray about it.

 

 

I’m always amazed when older Christians will say “you’re not serious, everything?”

 

 

I always give the same example and they tell me I can’t be serious. What’s my example? Simple, you go to a grocery store and you pray, “Lord let me buy only what I truly need and nothing bad for me or spend more than I should.” (that means you don’t shop with a credit card, scandalous heh.)

 

 

God bless and take care.

 

Scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

 

Prayer requests, questions, comments to the email address

 

Especially those that follow on twitter I almost never check my msgs there.

garbage brain

January 22, 2017

Image result for character that lives in a garbage can

we must control what comes into our minds.

 

Proverbs 4:23 says, “Watch over your heart with all diligence, for from it flow the springs of life.” Patrick Buchanan has observed, “The food that enters the mind must be watched as closely as the food that enters the body” (Reader’s Digest [11/89], p. 203). Frank Outlaw wrote, “Watch your thoughts, they become your words; watch your words, they become actions; watch your actions, they become habits; watch your habits, they become character; watch your character, for it becomes your destiny” (Reader’s Digest [date not known]). To obey what Paul is saying, we must exercise control over our thought life. This involves at least five things:

 

1. We need the mind of Christ through conversion.

 

Before a person knows Jesus Christ as Savior and Lord, he has a depraved mind (Rom. 1:28). He lives in the lusts of his flesh, indulging the desires of the flesh and of the mind (Eph. 2:3). God must supernaturally raise us from our state of being dead in our trespasses and sins (Eph. 2:1) and impart to us a new nature that is able to obey Him (Eph. 4:22-24). Paul says that “the mind set on the flesh is hostile toward God; for it does not subject itself to the law of God, for it is not even able to do so; and those who are in the flesh cannot please God. However, you are not in the flesh but in the Spirit, if indeed the Spirit of God dwells in you. But if anyone does not have the Spirit of Christ, he does not belong to Him” (Rom. 8:7-9). As he goes on to explain, the Holy Spirit gives us the power to put to death the deeds of the flesh and to live in obedience to God.

 

2. We must clean out and block out sources for sinful thoughts.

 

We cannot have a pure thought life without first ridding ourselves of things which defile us. It would be like trying to clean yourself while you’re lying in a mud hole. The first step is to get out of the mud and get to a source of soap and water. If we allow things into our lives which promote sensuality, greed, sexual impurity, crude language, violence, hatred, love of self, or anything else not pleasing to God, we cannot grow in holiness.

 

I agree with Pastor Kent Hughes, who in his book, Disciplines of a Godly Man ([Crossway Books], p. 75) writes, “I am aware of the wise warnings against using words like ‘all,’ ‘every,’ and ‘always’ in what I say. Absolutizing one’s pronouncements is dangerous. But I’m going to do it anyway. Here it is: It is impossible for any Christian who spends the bulk of his evenings, month after month, week upon week, day in and day out watching the major TV networks or contemporary videos to have a Christian mind. This is always true of all Christians in every situation!” (emphasis his). Amen!

 

It needs to be said: You will not be a godly person if you do not control the TV, videos, movies, music, magazines, books, and even the radio programs you take in. If something is polluting you or tempting you, get rid of it and make plans to avoid it!

 

3. Take in God’s Word from every source.

 

Read it daily. If you’re not a reader, listen to it on tape. You have no excuses for not saturating your mind with Scripture. As Kent Hughes also says, “You cannot be profoundly influenced by that which you do not know” (p. 77). I cannot encourage you enough to memorize verses that relate to problems you struggle with. Unless the Word is in your heart, God cannot use it when you are tempted (see Jesus’ example in fending off temptation, Matt. 4:1-11). You do not need to read the newspaper every day, but you desperately need to read your Bible every day! It’s like a daily shower–it cleanses off the dirt of the world (Eph. 5:26).

 

4. Expose your mind to the teaching and examples of the great Christians down through history.

 

Listen to and read sermons from godly men. The sermons and commentaries of John Calvin, Jonathan Edwards, Charles Spurgeon, J. C. Ryle, Martyn Lloyd-Jones, F. B Meyers, J. Vernon McGee and other giants of the faith are available in print. Read the biographies of these and other godly men and women. With a few exceptions, avoid most of the modern Christian best sellers, and spend your time reading the works that have stood the test of time. These men walked with God, and they will feed your soul.

 

5. Listen to wholesome music, especially the great hymns of the faith.

 

I enjoy many of the praise choruses, especially those that are taken directly from Scripture. But also, some of the great hymns have a history of sustaining God’s people down through the years, and they are doctrinally meaty. The Wesley’s used hymns to teach theology to many who were illiterate. Get recordings of the great hymns and play them until you know them by heart. They will fill your mind with wholesome truth. And not the 7/11 songs, the same 7 words sung 11 times, even if it’s the name of Jesus, it’s not a great song, avoid songs that sing about “I”, as I’m really something.

Challenge your song leader if your hymnal’s been changed to “fit the times”.

God bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

 

 

not your job

December 1, 2016

Yield_Sign_in_New_Hampshire

  “According as His divine power hath given unto us all things that pertain unto life and godliness, through the knowledge of Him that hath called us to glory and virtue” (2 Pet. 1:3).

 

 

  It is necessary for our Father to utilize very firm means in order to separate us from the ingrained idea that sanctification is produced by our work, plus His help.

 

 

 A superficial acquaintance with God’s plan leads to the view that while justification is God’s work, by faith in Christ, sanctification is our work, to be performed under the influence of the gratitude we feel for the deliverance we have experienced and by the aid of the Holy Spirit. But the earnest Christian soon finds how little gratitude can supply the power. When he thinks more prayer will bring it, he finds that, indispensable as prayer is, it is not enough.

Often the believer struggles hopelessly for years, until he listens to the teaching of the Spirit, as He glorifies Christ again, and reveals Christ, our Sanctification, to be appropriated by faith alone.

 

 

  Look not upon a life of holiness as a strain and an effort, but as the natural outgrowth of the life of Christ within you. And let ever again a quiet, hopeful, gladsome faith hold itself assured that all you need for a holy life will most assuredly be given you out of the holiness of the Lord Jesus. Thus will you understand and prove what it is to abide in Christ our Sanctification.

 

 

  “Whereby are given unto us exceeding great and precious promises: that by these ye might be partakers of the divine nature” (2 Pet. 1:4).

 

 

God bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

 

 

Please remember Paul K in your prayers, his surgery is soon and they believe that the tumor is cancerous

 

 

Pray for Matthew, next week he finds out if he has stomach cancer

 

 

For Veronica, she has gone off the deep end and now is trying to come back, which she is finding harder to do that she thought.

 

  “God . . . hath quickened us together with Christ and hath raised us up together, and made us sit together in heavenly places in Christ Jesus’ (Eph. 2:4–6).

 

 

  What is our attitude concerning our needs in the Christian life and warfare? Are we outside the armory, struggling and pleading for supplies? Or are we inside the arsenal, ready to be fully supplied and armed as our daily needs require? “Be strong in the Lord—be empowered through your union with Him; draw your strength from Him” (Eph. 6:10, Amp.).

 

 

  “It has come these days with new light and power that the first thing we have to see to as we draw near to God day by day is that our fellowship is with the Father, and with His Son Jesus Christ. If we listen in the stillness till our hearts begin to respond to what He is thinking and feeling about the matter in question, whether it concerns ourselves or others, we can, from that moment, begin praying downwards from the Throne, instead of praying upwards from ourselves.”

 

 

  “We must not think the revelation as to the will of God is an end in itself; it is but the first phase of a prayer ministry. When Daniel had prayed through to an understanding of the ways of the Lord, he then set himself three times a day to persevere in prayer for the fulfillment. His prayer ministry took him into the lion’s den, but it also brought him out again, and he was able to see the things through to the glorious end.”

 

 

  “Let us therefore come boldly unto the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy, and find grace to help in time of need” (Heb. 4:16).

 

 

God bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

 

In His Hands

November 20, 2016

Image result for a picture of god

Since the sovereign God has every atom in the universe precisely timed and controlled for the carrying out of His perfect will, it should not be difficult for us to understand why He is so meticulous in His development of us as His instruments. “Being predestinated according to the purpose of Him who worketh all things after the counsel of His own will (Eph. 1:11).

 

 

You are one of God’s rough diamonds, and He is going to have to cut you so that you may really shine for Him. It takes a diamond to cut a diamond. You are to be ground and cut, and hurt by other diamonds, by other Christians, by spiritual Christians.

 

 

God sends us such trials as are exactly fitted for us. Our Heavenly Father knows what will best serve us. He serves us by trials and by comforts. Let us remember that our trials are few—our evil ways are many; our worthiness nothing—our comforts great. When God tries us let us consider how we have been trying Him. By grace we will not murmur, but humble ourselves under His mighty hand, and He will exalt us in due time.”

 

 

“Beloved, think it not strange concerning the fiery trial which is to try you” (1 Pet. 4:12)

 

 

To bear up under trials, we must trust in the sovereign goodness of God in every situation.

  1. God is sovereign over all, even over the evil things people do.

  2. God is good in everything He does.

  3. We must trust the sovereign goodness of God in the midst of our trials.

  4. We must learn to live under the authority of God.

No matter how bad your day, God is in control, “though there be weeping in the night, joy comes in the morning” (Psalm 30:5)

 

 

God has counted every tear in your life, they are measured as surely as the seas know their boundaries. (GW)

 

Pray for my son Matthew, the doctors are leaning towards a diagnosis of stomach cancer.

 

In 40 plus years of ministry there are two things I can always count on no matter what the situation; 1, God is and always will be God. 2; I am and always will be His. Nothing can change those two things.

 

Worrying is a form of unbelief, STOP.

 

God bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

 

Chasing God

October 28, 2016

Image result for picture of a runner

In Hebrews 10:36, the author exhorted his readers, “For you have need of endurance, so that when you have done the will of God, you may receive what was promised” [lit., “the promise”]. Then he devotes chapter 11 to many examples of Old Testament saints who endured by faith, although they did not receive the promise (Christ), which we have received. In our text, he returns to the theme of endurance, saying, “We have both this great cloud of witnesses from the Old Testament and Jesus Himself, who is the supreme example of one who endured horrible suffering by faith. He endured the cross and now is at the Father’s right hand.”

 

To run the Christian marathon with endurance, faith focuses on Jesus, who endured the cross and received the reward.

  1. The Christian life is a difficult marathon that we must run.

Many years ago, a young woman who was a drug addict found my name in the phone book and began calling me frequently. She was married with two small children, but she was hooked on drugs. She had no concept that normal people sleep at night, and so she would call at 2 a.m. from some phone booth where she was stoned out of her mind.

 

She professed to believe in Christ, and said that she wanted to follow Him, but she had no idea of what that meant. On one occasion when she was relatively sober, I described in detail what a daily walk with Christ looks like. I explained what a daily time in the Word and prayer was like, what obedience to the Bible means, how to think like a Christian, etc.

When I was done, I asked, “Have you ever done anything close to what I’ve just described?” She said, “Yeah, I did that once for two weeks, but it didn’t work.” She thought that she had given it a fair try in two weeks! I explained to her that the Christian faith isn’t a two-week sprint. It’s a lifelong marathon.

 

 

The Christian life is a lifelong, grueling race that entails some long hills to climb and some swampy marshes to plod through. To make it to the end, you need self-discipline to get into good shape, you will need to maintain your motivation, and you will need sustained effort. No one enters a marathon with the thought of dropping out after a mile. Finishing well is everything. In this race, you are not competing with other believers. We’re all on the same team. We’re competing against the enemy of our souls, who opposes God’s kingdom and wants us to drop out.

  1. To run the Christian marathon, we must get into shape and stay in shape.

The primary thing, as I said, is self-discipline motivated by the goal of finishing well. But it specifically involves two things:

  1. We must lay aside every encumbrance.

The word means weight. It can refer to physical weight (obesity), or to unnecessary baggage. Ancient Greek runners would actually run naked so as not to be encumbered. Olympic athletes in our day wear some pretty skimpy outfits. They don’t want anything to slow them down or drain their energy.

 

 

Encumbrances are distinguished here from sins. They include things that are not intrinsically wrong, but they’re wrong because they keep you from running as you should. If you got rid of those heavy hiking boots and put on some jogging shoes, you’d run better. If you dropped the pack and dressed in shorts and a tank top, you might finish the race.

 

 

At the risk of stepping on some toes, but to help you apply this, let me get more specific. Let’s say that in the morning, you don’t have time to read your Bible and your favorite blog before you head out the door to work or school. Which do you choose? You protest, “But I need to keep abreast of what’s happening in the world!” Really? Where does the Bible say that? It does say that you need to drink in “the pure milk of the word, so that by it you may grow in respect to salvation” (1 Pet. 2:2). Maybe you don’t have time to read anything because you don’t set your alarm early enough to spend just 10 minutes with the Lord. You need to shed the encumbrance of loving sleep or the paper more than God.

 

 

Too much recreation can be another encumbrance in the race. We all need some free time free to be renewed, but the question is, “How much time do you need?” Many Christians fill every evening watching TV or playing video games, but they don’t have time to study the Bible or read good books. They view the entire weekend as a time for recreation, even if it means missing church. To run the race, you’ve got to lay aside these encumbrances.

 

 

Some Christians ask the wrong question here. They ask, “What’s wrong with this movie, or listening to this music, or participating in this activity?” The right question is, “Does this help me to grow in godliness?” If not, cast it off as dead weight.

  1. We must lay aside every sin that so easily entangles us.

In biblical times people wore long robes. You can’t run with a long robe entangling your legs. You must either pull it up and tuck it in your belt or cast it totally aside. In the case of sin, you must totally get rid of it if you want to run the Christian race.

 

 

This doesn’t refer only to certain besetting sins, but to all sins. Sin always begins in the mind, and so we must judge all sin at the thought level. Pride, lust, envy, greed, anger, grumbling, selfishness—all of these things originate in our thought life. If you cut it off there, it goes no farther. If you entertain these things, they incubate and develop into sinful words and actions (James 1:14-15). But the author’s point is, you can’t run the Christian race if you keep tripping over your sins.

  1. To run the Christian marathon, we must run with endurance the course set before us.

Note two things:

  1. God sets the course.

If you’re running a marathon, you can’t make up your own course. If you stray from the course, you’ll be disqualified. The race is “set before us,” just as Jesus had “the joy set before Him.” God is the Sovereign One who sets the course for each of us, just as He set the course of the cross for Jesus.

 

 

To finish the Christian marathon, it’s important to keep in mind at all times that the Sovereign God sets the course. You may not like parts of the course. You may be prone to grumble, “Why did the course have to go over this hill, or through this swamp?” The answer is, “Because the Sovereign God planned it this way.” You won’t be able to run by faith unless you submit your will to His will.

  1. We must run with endurance.

Running with endurance requires adopting a certain mindset. If you have in mind that you’re running a 400-meter race, you’re not going to do well when the pack keeps going after 400 meters. When you learn that the race has barely begun, you’re going to quit with a bad attitude.

 

 

This is what Jesus meant when He talked about counting the cost of following Him (Luke 14:28-33). Before you make a glib commitment to be a Christian, think it through. Are you willing to put out the effort, the sweat, the endurance, and the pain of going the distance? If not, don’t start the race, because you’re going to look pretty silly when you drop out after 400 meters!

 

 

Obviously, one key to running the whole distance is motivation. But where do you get the motivation to run the Christian marathon? Our author suggests two sources, both valuable, but the second is incomparably greater than the first.

  1. The encouragement to keep running comes from those who have run before us, but primarily from Jesus Himself.

  2. The great cloud of witnesses encourages us to keep running.

The opening phrase of 12:1 refers back to chapter 11. All of the Old Testament saints, who endured all sorts of trials by faith, should encourage us to keep running when we feel like quitting. The word cloud was a classical Greek metaphor for a large multitude

There is a question about whether these witnesses are watching us from heaven as we run the race; or, more in line with the meaning of the word witness, do we look to their testimony as an example of how to run the race? There is no indication in the Bible (unless it is here) that those in heaven are watching us on earth.

Probably, with the race metaphor, the picture here is that as we run the race, along the route we encounter the Old Testament saints (and, by extension, other heroes of the faith in the New Testament, plus those who lived after biblical times). They are calling out to us by their examples of faith, “Keep going, I made it and you can, too! I know it’s hard, but the reward is worth it! Don’t quit! The finish line is not too far ahead!”

 

 

I would encourage you to study both the many interesting characters in the Bible and the great men and women who have run the race of faith over the course of church history. You’ll learn how they failed, so that you don’t have to make the same mistakes. And you’ll learn how they ran well, so that you can imitate their faith (13:7). Many of the battles they fought, whether on a personal level or in their ministries, you will have to fight, too.

 

 

No matter how tired, how worn, the bible promises rest and strength, they are both found by taking time to be with God.

 

God bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

 

stick to it

October 16, 2016

Image result for picture of a greek soldier

We’re Baaaaaaaaaaaaaackkkkk, router fixed, fiber optic cable repaired and new what ever they call that box on the pole.

If last night’s devotion was poorly written, sorry about that, did it at the last minuete on an Ipad, which I hate and could barely see. So it is about

PERSEVERANCE

In 490 BC, the Athenians defeated the invading Persian army in the plain of Marathon, located roughly 26 miles north of Athens. According to legend, the Athenians ordered the messenger Pheidippides to run ahead and announce the victory to the city. When he reached Athens’s public square, Pheidippides shouted, “Rejoice! We conquer”—and then collapsed dead from exhaustion.

 Paul may have had Pheidippides—the inspiration for the marathon—in mind when he compared the Christian life to running a long-distance race (see 1Co 9:24–27). Like a marathon, the Christian life requires perseverance to finish well (see Rev 14:12).

 Here are three things to know about the discipline of spiritual perseverance:

  1. What perseverance is—Perseverance is the steady persistence in a course of action or purpose, especially in spite of difficulties, obstacles or discouragement. In the Bible the term refers to the continual and patient dependence of the Christian upon Christ. In its spiritual application perseverance always has to do with continuance in the Christian way.

  2. Why we persevere—We must persevere because Jesus is coming: “I am coming soon. Hold on to what you have, so that no one will take your crown” (Rev 3:11). We can and must persevere because Jesus cannot be defeated—and therefore we, who abide in him, ultimately cannot be defeated either. As Oswald Chambers wrote,

  Perseverance is more than endurance. It is endurance combined with absolute assurance and certainty that what we are looking for is going to happen. Perseverance means more than just hanging on, which may be only exposing our fear of letting go and falling. Perseverance is our supreme effort of refusing to believe that our hero is going to be conquered.

  1. Where we must persevere—The New Testament everywhere urges perseverance, but it mentions certain areas explicitly. The New Testament says we must persevere in prayer (mentioned eight times, e.g., see Lk 18:1–8; Col 4:2), in doing good (mentioned five times, e.g., see Ro 2:7; Gal 6:9), in Christian teaching (mentioned four times, e.g., see Ac 2:42; 2Ti 3:14), in grace (see Ac 13:43; 2Co 6:1), in faith (see Ac 14:22; Col 1:23) and in divine love (see Jn 15:9; Jude 21).

STAND FAST

Often the winner is the guy who just shows up, be that person, show up.

I love stats and weird facts, so here goes; 87% of highly successful people do this every day; MAKE THEIR BEDS.

God bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

Early voting starts soon (in Texas) VOTE OR SHUT UP

Prayer requests, comments and questions to the email address please

Pray for Wilma, beginnings of dementia, fell again today, 5th time this year and she won’t follow instructions.

Pray for people to understand loyalty and perseverance.

Pray for Bobbie G, she is having major heart surgery tomorrow

Pray for Carmine, she is going through some tough surgery

Pray for chuck, he just went through a triple bypass and I caught him eating fudge today.

 

what is man, the question

October 5, 2016

Image result for picture of a monkey looking at a man

What is man? Something to think about.

The first thing we learn about the actual physical creation of man is that “The Lord God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living being” (v. 7).

The simplicity of this description, when placed alongside the complex theories and brilliant dissertations which are the products of man’s incessant search for discovery of everything including himself, serves only to show that there is fundamental truth here, elastic enough to contain all that future discoveries would reveal.

The Bible states unequivocally that man, like the animals, comes from the “dust of the ground” and, moreover, will return to it (Gen. 3:19). Coder and Howe in their book The Bible, Science and Creation have taken the trouble to calculate that “the human body is composed of about fifty-eight pounds of oxygen, two ounces of salt, fifty quarts of water, three pounds of calcium, twenty-four pounds of carbon, and some chlorine, phosphorous, fat, iron, sulphur, and glycerine.” Of course it is one thing to make a pile of all these common elements, but it is another thing entirely to make a man out of them.

The big question is “How did we get from the pile of dust to the complex and wonderful creature called man?” The most controversial answer to the question is wrapped up in the word “evolution”—a word which is gospel to many and strikes horror in the hearts of others. From the nineteenth century, when Darwin’s book On the Origin of Species was published, to the present time the debate has been perpetuated. It has often generated more heat than light and is so intense that it has even found its way into the hallowed halls of the Supreme Court of the United States of America. The original opposition to Darwin’s theory, which subsequent events have shown was well founded, claimed that if mankind was led to believe that it was caught up in an impersonal, mechanistic universe in which only the fittest survived, all manner of callousness, cynicism, and cruelty would result. The debate quickly degenerated into a black and white polarization of views which stated either that everything was made purposefully by God or everything was the result of chance. The choice became one between purposeful creation leading to meaning for existence and chance survival in a hostile environment leading to meaninglessness and despair. Even in the early days of the debate there were believing and unbelieving voices of moderation, and today there are those who, while holding firmly to man being purposefully created by a loving God, are open to the possibility that God’s methods could have been evolutionary.

 

 

The debate on how mankind came from dust to be as brilliant as Einstein and as creative as Mozart and as beautiful as Helen of Troy should not be allowed to obscure the fact that it happened and that the Scriptures unequivocally point to the masterly hand of the Lord God. To underemphasize man’s “dustness” would be to divorce man from his God-ordained environment—earth. It may also lead him to become arrogant—a condition which can be quickly remedied when he is confronted with the inevitability of his demise and the subsequent processes which will return him to his “dustness”! On the other hand, to overemphasize the “dustness” is to miss the point that as well as being a natural being man is also a spiritual being.

 

 

Paul Tournier, in one of his books, tells how he as a resident of Switzerland was used to seeing the Matterhorn from the perspective where it leaned to the left. When he saw a poster depicting the mountain leaning to the right, he thought it was a mistake until he realized it was produced in Italy and was an accurate depiction of the mountain from that perspective. In the same way man can be viewed from different perspectives. He is natural but he is also spiritual.