BUT GOD!

May 19, 2017

Isaiah 55:1-3

English Standard Version (ESV)

The Compassion of the Lord

55 “Come, everyone who thirsts,
come to the waters;
and he who has no money,
come, buy and eat!
Come, buy wine and milk
without money and without price.
Why do you spend your money for that which is not bread,
and your labor for that which does not satisfy?
Listen diligently to me, and eat what is good,
and delight yourselves in rich food.
Incline your ear, and come to me;
hear, that your soul may live;
and I will make with you an everlasting covenant,
my steadfast, sure love for David.

55:1, 2 In ch. 55 the Lord issues a general call to all who would call themselves by His name, to abandon the Babylons of this world and to find their satisfaction and their security in Him alone, and in that city of joy and peace that He will build. This passage is a call to revival for all who have wandered far from the Lord or from that grace which is the basis for our relationship with Him.

The human condition, we chase after things that won’t satisfy, that don’t bring any lasting satisfaction.

 

 

I remembering counseling a guy one time that was dealing with sexual addiction. The reason he came in was he just had fulfilled his ultimate sex fantasy, and as he was leaving the apartment where this act had taken place he understood that in 10 minutes he was wondering what he would do to top that, and all of a sudden he realized the lust was still there; it hadn’t been satisfied at all.

Sin is like that, lust of the flesh, the eyes, the mind; drugs, booze, sex, shopping; it never ends.

 

But God.

 

One of the greatest sermons in the bible; “But God.”

 

Only He can give us satisfaction, rest, peace, and end to self-destruction.

Come all that are weary, and He will give you rest.

 

The first move is up to us, come, seek, then He does His part.

 

It’s your move

 

God bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

 

Pray for all those searching for a good church home

 

Only God can give real happiness and lasting joy, everything else is artificial.

 

biblios lover

April 29, 2017

In 1863 Charles Spurgeon preached a sermon on 2 Timothy 4:13 (“When you come, bring the cloak that I left with Carpus at Troas, and my scrolls, especially the parchments.”) In the sermon he said,

 

  The apostle says to Timothy and so he says to every preacher, “Give thyself unto reading.” The man who never reads will never be read; he who never quotes will never be quoted. He who will not use the thoughts of other men’s brains, proves that he has no brains of his own. Brethren, what is true of ministers is true of all our people.

 

 

 You need to read. Renounce as much as you will all light literature, but study as much as possible sound theological works, especially the Puritan writers, and expositions of the Bible.

 

 We are quite persuaded that the very best way for you to be spending your leisure, is to be either reading or praying. You may get much instruction from books which afterwards you may use as a true weapon in your Lord and Master’s service. Paul cries, “Bring the books”—join in the cry.

 

  Many of us recognize that reading is a key way to gain wisdom and insight. But it’s not always easy to find the time to read books. If this is a problem for you, here are a few tips that can help you read more:

 

  ➤ Set aside 15 minutes—Make a commitment to read for a minimum of 15 minutes every day. No matter how busy our lives might be, we can find a quarter of an hour out of the 24 we are given daily to find time to read.

But what can be accomplished in that amount of time? Quite a lot, actually. The average adult reads prose text at 250 to 300 words per minute. With 15 minutes a day you could read 3,750 words. In one year (365 days) you would read for 5,475 minutes. Multiply that times 250 words per minute and you get 1,368,750 words per year. Most books have between 300 and 400 words per page.

 If we take 350 words per page and divide that into 1,368,750 words per year, we get 3,910 pages per year. This means that at 250 words a minute, 15 minutes a day, you could read about 20 average-sized books a year. In five years you could read 100 books; 200 in a decade. All with only 15 minutes per day.

 

 ➤ Make a reading list—After you finish a book, you want to have another one ready to start. Make a proposed reading list of the books you want to read. Be sure to include a variety in case you decide that the next book on the list isn’t the next one you want to read. You don’t have to use the list as a rigid schedule, but it will help prevent you from losing days or weeks while you search for new reading material.

 

 ➤ Use audiobooks—Yes, audiobooks count as “reading” (don’t let print snobs tell you differently). Audiobooks might not be the best fit for topics you are unfamiliar with or that require close concentration, but they can be a refreshing way to help you “read” more books. They can also help you add more fiction or other imaginative literature to your daily reading.

 

 

 ➤ Have vegetables and dessert—If the only time you read is when you force yourself to “eat your cultural vegetables” (i.e., read books that require serious focus, attention and thought), you might soon grow tired of reading and give it up altogether. For every “vegetable” book you read, add a “dessert” book to read on the side. Light reading (as long as it’s not corrosive to the soul) can help keep our minds fit and limber for the heavy lifting of more serious texts.

 

 

Redeem the time—Make a list of all the activities you do every day. Look for areas where you can trade some time spent on unproductive leisure activity (such as watching television or playing video games) for time to develop wisdom and insight by reading more.

 

 

One of the questions I get asked quite often is how can I write a devotion every day. The answer is simple, I read a lot. I only watch television one day a week and then only for two hours, that’s for a week. I spend 4 hours every day reading. My wife who was never a reader, now reads one book per week. I average several per week. I love multivolume sets, it took me twenty years but I finally read the complete Harvard set of Classics. Did I enjoy every book, not all, I’ve read the “100 books you have to read in your lifetime,” and frankly I really didn’t like 20 of them, but there were nuggets in each one.

 

 

I can remember when reading 5 verses of the bible each day was hard, now 5 chapters in the morning, 5 in the evening. My wife kids me because I have books stacked up everywhere including one on the tractor, and I can read while walking (city walking). You CAN learn to love reading.

 

 

One word of advice, make your kids read real books not just electronic versions, science has proven that electronic reading only doesn’t develop the brain like the printed page. And teach your kids from age 2 to be at least bilingual.

 

 

Read every kind of book, hard to read, ones that make you think, there are several books that I read once every year and there are some books that take me a year to read as there is to much so absorb.

 

 

God bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

 

 

Remember in prayer

Joe R, and his shoulder

Randy H and his knew

Leslie and her mother’s battle with cancer.

Quinton and his recovery from surgery.

TALK THE WALK

March 25, 2017

When I was preaching through Genesis a man told me that he had become excited about being involved in church after many years’ absence. When I asked what had made the difference he said, “I love Genesis!” I was surprised and asked, “What do you like about it?” and he replied, “I like the stories about all those guys like Abram and Jacob because they’re all worse than me and it makes me feel so good!” I agreed with him that Abram was not perfect but he was a man of faith, and that we should not gloat over his failures but learn from his mistakes and emulate his strong dependence on the faithful God. You’ll be glad to know that my friend eventually came to call on Abram’s God.

How’s your walk?

No, this is not a commercial for some sort of cushioned insoles for your shoes. The real question is, rather, how is your walk with the Lord?

In Scripture, “walk” is often the term figuratively referring to a person’s conduct or way or life. One of the highest compliments the Bible gives anyone is that they “walked with God.” That’s what was said about Enoch in Genesis 5:24. It so pleased God that, according to some Bible scholars, Enoch never tasted death – he was raptured to heaven by God (“…God took him”).

Paul says that Christians should “walk not according to the flesh but according to the Spirit” (Romans 8:4). John tells us we should “walk” in the light, which is Christ (1 John 1:7).

Why is such a “walk” important? Well, as Christians we certainly are to live in such a way that glorifies God. It’s how we should live our lives — honoring God in all that we do and in our relationships and interaction with others. How we do that is our “walk” as Christians.

But not only does it benefit us personally to live for Christ – according to His precepts – it is also extremely important regarding our witness to others. After all, that’s why Christ leaves us here on earth after we accept Him – to be a witness to others who haven’t found Him yet. That’s why we should – must – tell others about Christ. Yes, with words. (Romans 10:14.) But sometimes the first thing someone notices about us is not what we’re saying, but, rather, how we’re living.

One of the world’s biggest objections to Christianity is that Christians “are all hypocrites” who don’t live what they preach. “They all have a ‘holier-than-thou attitude’ and yet they live like everybody else – lying, cheating, living selfishly, etc., etc., etc.”

If our words about Christ are to have any credibility whatsoever, our lives, our actions, our “walk” must totally reflect what we’re saying. Our walk must show that we truly believe what Christ taught. Your “walk” … must “talk!”

That’s the theme of a song written by Rodney Griffin and Babbie Mason called “Your Walk Talks,” recently recorded by the Mark Trammell Quartet. Here’s how the song* says it:

        You know, your walk talks, and your talk talks

        But your walk talks louder than your talk talks

        Your behavior toward your neighbor

        Is really how you feel about the Savior

        When you exemplify and shine the Light of Christ

        You know the number in the kingdom will be multiplied

        Yes, your walk talks, and your talk talks,

        But your walk talks louder than your talk talks.

How you live your life – your “walk” – speaks more loudly and clearly to others than anything you would say verbally (as important and indispensable as that is). Have you thought about that line in the song – “Your behavior toward your neighbor is really how you feel about the Savior?” That can be convicting. If you profess to love Christ, you should do what He taught – love your neighbor.

        What did you do today to give your love away

        To a lost and hurting soul?

        Did you lend a hand to a fellow man

        And help him on down the road?

        When you illuminate it takes the dark away

        So let your little light shine

        When we follow through with what we say and do

        The Father will be glorified.

I think sometimes the world is surprised when a Christian actually does live like Christ. It baffles them because it’s not, unfortunately, what they’ve been conditioned by the world to expect. And that contrast – between expectations and observed actions – can actually get their attention in a very positive way.

About the message of that song, “…the Bible says we are a ‘peculiar people’ if we truly walk the walk and talk the talk. And we are. I think that’s the greatest compliment to a child of God in the 21st century, for someone to say, ‘you’re just a little bit strange.’ You’re not supposed to love someone when they walk up and slap you in the face. You’re not supposed to turn the other cheek.”

There’s only one way a Christian can actually do that: “We all know that we can’t be what we need to be outside of the infiltration of the Holy Spirit into our lives [and] allowing Jesus to live through us. This song is a happy little way of reminding folks just how important our walk is and the fact that it does talk louder than what our lips say.”

So…. Does your “walk” talk? It is saying something to those around you. And, when your walk does talk, what does it say?

How strong is your faith?

How close is your walk?

Do people desire to know your God?

Walk the walk, talk the talk.

Blessings from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

 

Our Heavenly Father never differs from Himself, in other word He never changes. There is not an Old Testament God and a New Testament, one God. In coming to Him at any time we need not wonder whether we shall find Him in a receptive mood. He is always receptive to misery and need, as well as to love and faith. He does not keep office hours nor set aside periods when He will see no one. Neither does He change His mind about anything. God never changes moods or cools off in His affections or loses enthusiasm.

 

 

God will not compromise and He need not be coaxed. He cannot be persuaded to alter His Word nor talked into answering selfish prayer. In all our efforts to find God, to please Him, to commune with Him, we should remember that all change must be on our part. “I am the Lord, I change not.” We have but to meet His clearly stated terms, bring our lives into accord with His revealed will, and His infinite power will become instantly operative toward us in the manner set forth through the gospel in the Scriptures of truth.

 

 

“I am that I am,” says God, “I change not.” As the sailor locates his position on the sea by “shooting” the sun, so we may get our moral bearings by looking at God. We must begin with God.

 

 

Much of our difficulty as seeking Christians stems from our unwillingness to take God as He is and adjust our lives accordingly. We insist upon trying to modify Him and to bring Him nearer to our own image. The flesh whimpers against the rigor of God’s inexorable sentence and begs like for a little mercy, a little indulgence of its carnal ways. It is no use. We can get a right start only by accepting God as He is and learning to love Him for what He is. As we go on to know Him better we shall find it a source of unspeakable joy that God is just what He is.

 

 

How completely satisfying to turn from our limitations to a God who has none. Eternal years lie in His heart. For Him time does not pass, it remains; and those who are in Christ share with Him all the riches of limitless time and endless years. God never hurries. There are no deadlines against which He must work. Only to know this is to quiet our spirits and relax our nerves. For those out of Christ, time is a devouring beast.

 

 

The Christian man possesses God’s own life and shares His infinitude with Him. In God there is life enough for all and time enough to enjoy it. His love is boundless.

If faith is the gaze of the heart at God, and if this gaze is but the raising of the inward eyes to meet the all-seeing eyes of God, then it follows that it is one of the easiest things possible to do. It would be like God to make the most vital thing easy and place it within the range of possibility for the weakest and poorest of us.

 

 

To know God is at once the easiest and the most difficult thing in the world. It is easy because the knowledge is not won by hard mental toil, but is something freely given. As sunlight falls on the open field, so the knowledge of the holy God is a free gift to men who are open to receive it. But this knowledge is difficult because there are conditions to be met and the obstinate nature of fallen man does not take kindly to them.

As you read your bible, keep saying to yourself, “I Believe Every Word”

 

 

If you have doubts about the bible please read “from God to us” by Geisler and Nix.

 

 

God Bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

 

 

Keep Lori in pray as she undergoes chemo.

 

Pray for those under great stress

 

Pray for Ron U, adopted, and now 49, meeting his bio mom on Friday.

 

let it go

March 9, 2017

Image result for picture of someone crying

Tears resulting from sadness, anger, fear or joy vary chemically from those caused by smelling onions and may be nature’s method of removing chemicals built up by stress from the body. Dr. William Frey II, of the Psychiatry Research Laboratories at the St. Paul-Ramsey Medical Center, St. Paul, Minn., believes this to be the case. Studies he has done indicate that women cry five times as often as men and that 85% of the women and 73% of the men thought that crying made them feel better. Most common reason for crying is sadness, followed in rank by happiness, anger, sympathy, anxiety and fear.

 

 

The late Scottish preacher, Alexander Whyte, observed that we all tend to hang heavy weights on the thinnest wires (source unknown). He meant that we hang our happiness on fragile things that easily and quickly can be taken from us: health, mates, children, jobs, homes, or possessions. These are all good blessings from the Lord. But they’re inadequate as a foundation for lasting joy, because they’re all so uncertain and transitory.

 

While any major loss is emotionally painful, it’s crucial that we learn how to work through such losses biblically, because we’re all going to face them. Peter (1 Pet. 5:8-9) indicates that it is precisely in times of suffering that the devil seeks to destroy our faith. I’ve seen many believers who have wiped out spiritually because they didn’t know how to face suffering biblically.

 

 

For example, some have the mistaken notion that because they believe in Jesus, He will protect them from major suffering. When tragedy hits, they feel that God had abandoned them. Others were taught to claim healing by faith. When that didn’t work, they were told that they didn’t have enough faith. Others have been under the impression that it is unspiritual to grieve or shed tears. So they tried to smile and say, “Praise the Lord,” around other Christians, but they were dying inside.

 

 

Everyone seems to forget in the parable of the two men, one built his house upon the sand and one built his house upon the rock, yes, the foundation of our life matters, but the point often missed is the storm hits both.

 

 

Storms come and they go, sorrow and sadness hopefully comes and goes. If one event in your life has brought you what seems to be permanent sadness, then you have not allowed yourself to go through the steps of grief and come out the other side. Bad news no one can help you, good news you can help yourself by losing the anger and believe that God wants you to live in joy not perpetual sorrow.

 

 

God bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

 

huh?

March 3, 2017

HUH??

(today is the anniversary of my grandfather’s passing, so in honor of him, thank you for stepping in to be my dad)

 

 

SO MY GRANDFATHER WAS VERY HARD OF HEARING, AND EVERY SUNDAY WE WOULD GET DRESSED UP AND GO TO CHURCH; WE WOULD SIT ABOUT HALF WAY BACK ON THE RIGHT SIDE AND HE WOULD GO TO SLEEP AS SOON AS THE SERMON STARTED. IF HE DIDN’T SNORE OR THROW HIS HEAD BACK WITH HIS MOUTH WIDE OPEN GRANDMA WOULD LET HIM SLEEP.

 

 

WHEN WE GOT OUT TO THE CAR SHE WOULD ALWAYS ASK HIM; “WHY DO YOU ALWAYS FALL ASLEEP DURING THE SERMON”? HIS RESPONSE WAS ALWAYS THE SAME; ‘I CAN’T HEAR HIM’.

 

 

THEN MY GRANDMOTHER WOULD SAY, “WHY DON’T WE SIT UP FRONT THEY HAVE SPECIAL HEARING DEVICES IN THE FRONT LEFT PEWS AND YOU COULD HEAR THE SERMON”. FOR A MOMENT HE WOULDN’T ANSWER AND INEVITABLY SHE WOULD SAY, “WELL”.

AND THEN CAME HIS STANDARD RESPONSE, “I GO TO CHURCH BECAUSE YOU WANT ME TO, I DON’T NEED TO HEAR THE DAMN SERMONS AS WELL”.

 

 

I’D LAUGH AND GET THE LOOK.

 

 

IT WASN’T TILL YEARS AFTER HE DIED I FOUND OUT HE WAS RAISED IN A VERY STRICT (READ ULTRA) STRICT PENTECOSTAL HOME AND CONSTANTLY FOUGHT WITH HIS PARENTS ABOUT GOING TO CHURCH.

 

 

I CAME HOME ON LEAVE IN THE MILITARY WHEN I FOUND OUT HE WAS DYING OF CANCER, AND HE ACCEPTED THE LORD. I ASKED HIM WHY HE NEVER WANTED TO LISTEN TO OUR PREACHER, HIS COMMENT WAS,” I’VE HEARD ENOUGH SERMONS IN CHURCH AND AT HOME TO LIVE A LIFETIME”.

 

 

WELL NOW MY WIFE AND I ARE GETTING OLDER AND WE ARE LOSING OUR HEARING, AND OUR TWO MOST COMMON PHRASES ARE, “HUH” OR ‘WHAT DID YOU SAY’.

 

 

WHICH IS HILARIOUS BECAUSE WE USUALLY MISUNDERSTAND WHAT THE OTHER ONE SAYS AND COME UP WITH THE WRONG ANSWER TO THE QUESTION.

 

 

WHICH BRINGS ME TO OUR VERSE FOR TODAY;

 

PSALMS 135:17 They have ears, but cannot hear….

 

LET’S MAKE SURE WE DON’T GET SPIRITUALLY DEAF AND MISS OUT ON THE LORD SPEAKING TO US, IT CAN BE THROUGH HIS WORD, SONGS, FRIENDS, HECK IN THE OLD TESTAMENT EVEN A JACKASS SPOKE FOR THE LORD.

 

 

MY ADVICE LISTEN BETTER, LONGER, MORE OFTEN, WHICH BRINGS ME TO AN OLD CLICHÉ; “GOD GAVE US TWO EARS AND ONE MOUTH, WE SHOULD LISTEN MORE AND SPEAK LESS.”

GOD BLESS

 

 

REMEMBER SEND YOU PRAYER REQUESTS TO SCUMLIKEUSCHURCH@GMAIL.COM

 

 

AND WE ARE HAVING ANOTHER BIBLE GIVE AWAY. TELL US WHAT DEVOTION HAS REPOSTED THE MOST (REQUESTED).

 

 

 

ALSO HAS ANY ONE HEARD FROM MONOCHROMATIC?

 

evil vs good

February 26, 2017

Image result for picture of good fighting evil

PSALM 73 WHY THE WICKED PROSPER AND THE RIGHTEOUS SUFFER; PART ONE

THIS POST WILL SEEM LONGER THAN IT IS BECAUSE OF ALL THE SCRIPTURE GIVEN.

PSALM 73

1 Surely God is good to Israel,

To those who are pure in heart!

2 But as for me, my feet came close to stumbling,

My steps had almost slipped.

3 For I was envious of the arrogant

As I saw the prosperity of the wicked.

4 For there are no pains in their death,

And their body is fat.

5 They are not in trouble as other men,

Nor are they plagued like mankind.

6 Therefore pride is their necklace;

The garment of violence covers them.

7 Their eye bulges from fatness;

The imaginations of their heart run riot.

8 They mock and wickedly speak of oppression;

They speak from on high.

9 They have set their mouth against the heavens,

And their tongue parades through the earth.

10 Therefore his people return to this place,

And waters of abundance are drunk by them.

11 They say, “How does God know?

And is there knowledge with the Most High?”

12 Behold, these are the wicked;

And always at ease, they have increased in wealth.

13 Surely in vain I have kept my heart pure

And washed my hands in innocence;

14 For I have been stricken all day long

And chastened every morning.

15 If I had said, “I will speak thus,”

Behold, I would have betrayed the generation of Your children.

16 When I pondered to understand this,

It was troublesome in my sight

17 Until I came into the sanctuary of God;

Then I perceived their end.

18 Surely You set them in slippery places;

You cast them down to destruction.

19 How they are destroyed in a moment!

They are utterly swept away by sudden terrors!

20 Like a dream when one awakes, O Lord, when aroused,

You will despise their form.

21 When my heart was embittered

And I was pierced within,

22 Then I was senseless and ignorant;

I was like a beast before You.

23 Nevertheless I am continually with You;

You have taken hold of my right hand.

24 With Your counsel You will guide me,

And afterward receive me to glory.

25 Whom have I in heaven but You?

And besides You, I desire nothing on earth.

26 My flesh and my heart may fail,

But God is the strength of my heart and my portion forever.

27 For, behold, those who are far from You will perish;

You have destroyed all those who are unfaithful to You.

28 But as for me, the nearness of God is my good;

I have made the Lord GOD my refuge,

That I may tell of all Your works (Psalm 73:1-28, NAU).

Some may think of the psalmists and their words as “long ago and far away,” but it doesn’t take a great deal of effort to see the relevance of Psalm 73 to Christians today, and more specifically to American Christians in times like these. Let’s begin by taking a “bird’s eye” view of the entire Psalm, and then consider the message God has for us in these inspired words. Verse one is Asaph’s affirmation of faith in God’s goodness.  In a sense, it serves as both Asaph’s introduction and as his conclusion. It indicates where Asaph is headed in this psalm,1 and it is where Asaph will end up when all is said and done. From verses 2-14 Asaph confesses his sin (of envying the wicked) by describing how he viewed his circumstances from a merely human point of view. In verses 15-17 we see the point to which his observations led him – the temptation to give up his pursuit of God to live a sinful lifestyle that seemingly led to prosperity – and the turning point that set him straight in his thinking. In verses 18—26 Asaph is now able to view life through different eyes, and thus to articulate a divine perspective on the very things that had once troubled him. This led him to a greater love for God. Verses 27 and 28 summarize the outcome of his transformed thinking regarding living in a fallen world, where the wicked appear to be the winners and the righteous appear to be the losers.

Asaph2 is the psalmist here, and he confesses that at one point in time he was very unhappy with what he saw going on about him in Israel: the wicked appeared to be blessed, while the “righteous” seemed destined for suffering:

3 For I was envious of the arrogant

As I saw the prosperity of the wicked.

4 For there are no pains in their death,

And their body is fat.

5 They are not in trouble as other men,

Nor are they plagued like mankind (Psalm 73:3-5).

Parenthetically, let me say that it is very difficult to see life clearly when seeking to do so through the tear-filled eyes of self-pity. Asaph overstates (all right, he exaggerates) the prosperity and ease of the wicked, and the suffering of the righteous as well. Nevertheless, his words accurately convey the way he once viewed life.

Asaph is right about one thing: from a merely human perspective, the wicked do seem to be succeeding in their sinful pursuits. Worse yet, they are emboldened by their apparent success. They flaunt their opulence, and they are more than willing to resort to violence. Through Asaph’s eyes, they take great pleasure in doing so. Indeed, they are inspired by their “success” to devise even more wicked schemes.

6 Therefore pride is their necklace;

The garment of violence covers them.

7 Their eye bulges from fatness;

The imaginations of their heart run riot (Psalm 73:6-7).

The success of the wicked makes them arrogant toward their fellow men; they even become arrogant toward God:

8 They mock and wickedly speak of oppression;

They speak from on high.

9 They have set their mouth against the heavens,

And their tongue parades through the earth.

10 Therefore his people return to this place,

And waters of abundance are drunk by them.

11 They say, “How does God know?

And is there knowledge with the Most High?” (Psalm 73:8-11)

Asaph notes that the wicked seem to have concluded either that God is ignorant of their sin, or (worse yet) that He is indifferent toward it.

Before I become too critical of Asaph here, it would be good to consider some of the reasons for his mental and spiritual torment. Asaph knew that God is righteous, that He hates sin, and that He punishes the wicked. He also believed that God had promised to bless the righteous. This assurance of God’s hatred of sin, judgment of the wicked, and blessing of the righteous is based upon God’s words in the giving of the Law of Moses:

15 “See, I have set before you today life and prosperity, and death and adversity; 16 in that I command you today to love the LORD your God, to walk in His ways and to keep His commandments and His statutes and His judgments, that you may live and multiply, and that the LORD your God may bless you in the land where you are entering to possess it. 17 “But if your heart turns away and you will not obey, but are drawn away and worship other gods and serve them, 18 I declare to you today that you shall surely perish. You will not prolong your days in the land where you are crossing the Jordan to enter and possess it. 19 “I call heaven and earth to witness against you today, that I have set before you life and death, the blessing and the curse. So choose life in order that you may live, you and your descendants, 20 by loving the LORD your God, by obeying His voice, and by holding fast to Him; for this is your life and the length of your days, that you may live in the land which the LORD swore to your fathers, to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, to give them” (Deuteronomy 30:15-20; see also Leviticus 26 and Deuteronomy 28).

In Asaph’s mind, God seemed to be doing just the opposite. God appeared to be blessing the wicked, while at the same time He was punishing the righteous. God’s actions were perceived as inconsistent with His promises.

Looking back on his agony of soul, Asaph admits that his motivation and thinking were sinful:

1 Surely God is good to Israel,

To those who are pure in heart!

2 But as for me, my feet came close to stumbling,

My steps had almost slipped.

3 For I was envious of the arrogant

As I saw the prosperity of the wicked (Psalm 73:1-3).

Asaph was envious of the wicked. Expressed in different words, Asaph had more affection for the gold (God’s material blessings) than he did for God. As I look at God’s commandments in the Law I see great emphasis on loving God, which motivates one to obey His commands. God is more emphatic about loving Him and thus obeying His commands than He is about the material benefits of obedience. Notice how a love for God should motivate our obedience to God, resulting in blessing, while turning from God (to other gods) leads to disobedience and judgment.

13 “It shall come about, if you listen obediently to my commandments which I am commanding you today, to love the LORD your God and to serve Him with all your heart and all your soul, 14 that He will give the rain for your land in its season, the early and late rain, that you may gather in your grain and your new wine and your oil. 15 “He will give grass in your fields for your cattle, and you will eat and be satisfied. 16 “Beware that your hearts are not deceived, and that you do not turn away and serve other gods and worship them. 17 “Or the anger of the LORD will be kindled against you, and He will shut up the heavens so that there will be no rain and the ground will not yield its fruit; and you will perish quickly from the good land which the LORD is giving you (Deuteronomy 11:13-17, emphasis mine).

I can understand why the psalmist would be perplexed. Didn’t God promise to bless His people for their obedience to His law, and to punish those who disobeyed? We should remember that Asaph had written these words in Psalm 50:

14 “Offer to God a sacrifice of thanksgiving

And pay your vows to the Most High;

15 Call upon Me in the day of trouble;

I shall rescue you, and you will honor Me.”

16 But to the wicked God says, “What right have you to tell of My statutes

And to take My covenant in your mouth?

17 “For you hate discipline,

And you cast My words behind you.

18 “When you see a thief, you are pleased with him,

And you associate with adulterers.

19 “You let your mouth loose in evil

And your tongue frames deceit.

20 “You sit and speak against your brother;

You slander your own mother’s son.

21 “These things you have done and I kept silence;

You thought that I was just like you;

I will reprove you and state the case in order before your eyes.

22 “Now consider this, you who forget God,

Or I will tear you in pieces, and there will be none to deliver.

23 “He who offers a sacrifice of thanksgiving honors Me;

And to him who orders his way aright

I shall show the salvation of God” (Psalm 50:14-23).

Asaph’s earlier words in Psalm 50 certainly seem to promise salvation and blessings to the righteous, and judgment to the wicked. No wonder that Asaph is perplexed by what he sees. It would appear that God is not playing by the rules or, worse yet, that He is unaware or unconcerned by what is going on. Asaph is troubled to the point of considering giving up on persevering in the face of adversity.

If Asaph’s first confession is that of his envy of the material prosperity of the wicked, his second confession is that he began to think of his faith and obedience as a useless waste of energy:

13 Surely in vain I have kept my heart pure

And washed my hands in innocence;

14 For I have been stricken all day long

And chastened every morning.

15 If I had said, “I will speak thus,”

Behold, I would have betrayed the generation of Your children (Psalm 73:13-15).

This kind of thinking tempted Asaph to cast his faith aside and join the wicked in their evil pursuits (and thus to join them in their prosperity).

Part two tomorrow, Don’t throw in the towel.

God bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

 

holy prayers

February 17, 2017

praying mom

This is the third most asked question i

How can I learn to pray or how can I pray better

It just like sermon building, when you start with “Thus sayeth The Lord” its hard to go wrong, just like praying the Word of God, what you are doing is taking words that originated in the heart and mind of God and circulating them through your heart and mind back to God. By this means his words become the wings of your prayers.

 

You can’t go to far wrong with that. I say to far because you can take the verses our of context. That’s why good study bible like the “life application bible” will help you keep on track. Second I would add the one volume commentary by Matthew Henry. With those two resources you would be hard pressed to go the wrong way.

 

 

To pray the Bible, you simply go through the passage line by line, talking to God about whatever comes to mind as you read the text. See how easy that is? Anyone can do that.

 

 

And since faith comes from hearing the word of God, what better thing to do than read the bible out loud. So pray out loud, (it’s not just for Pentecostals you know).

pray about? Everything, right? The Bible tells us that in Philippians 4: 6: “Do not be anxious about anything, but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God.”

We may bring “everything by prayer” to God. Everything is something we may pray about. Every person, every object, every issue, every circumstance, every fear, every situation— everything in the universe is something we may bring before God. So every thought that enters your mind as you are reading a passage pray about it.

 

 

I’m always amazed when older Christians will say “you’re not serious, everything?”

 

 

I always give the same example and they tell me I can’t be serious. What’s my example? Simple, you go to a grocery store and you pray, “Lord let me buy only what I truly need and nothing bad for me or spend more than I should.” (that means you don’t shop with a credit card, scandalous heh.)

 

 

God bless and take care.

 

Scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

 

Prayer requests, questions, comments to the email address

 

Especially those that follow on twitter I almost never check my msgs there.

fellowship

February 5, 2017

We frequently use words we think we understand but don’t because they have deep theological connotations that transcend our understanding. This is often the case with the word fellowship.

 

 

 We often use the term, even within the church, in its colloquial sense of an association of people who have similar interests. And at times we do, regrettably, only engage in fellowship at that most basic level. The term, though, has a much richer meaning in the New Testament—a meaning that applies in our own fellowship.

 

 

 The apostle John writes, “We proclaim to you what we have seen and heard, so that you also may have fellowship with us. And our fellowship is with the Father and with his Son, Jesus Christ” (1Jn 1:3). Notice the fellowship John mentions is a connection in two directions: fellowship with the Godhead and fellowship with other believers. Scripture makes it clear that we only have fellowship with other Christians because we first have fellowship with Christ.

 

 

 The reality that Christ dwells within believers means we are connected to one another through the Holy Spirit. This relatedness, relationship and communion make up fellowship.

 

 

 The theological use for the Greek term for fellowship also includes participation and sharing. Fellowship therefore entails:

  ➤ Mutual participation in the Lord’s Supper—Paul says when believers assemble to partake of the Lord’s Supper we become one body with Christ, and thus one with each other (see 1Co 10:17).

 ➤ Mutual participation in suffering—When we are persecuted for the sake of Jesus we participate in his suffering (see 1Pe 4:13). Thus, when other believers are persecuted for the faith we join in fellowship with their suffering too.

 ➤ Mutual sharing of resources—Paul makes it clear that fellowship entails mutual sharing within the church of material and spiritual goods (see Ro 15:25–31). He also says we must “carry each other’s burdens, and in this way you will fulfill the law of Christ” (Gal 6:2). Fellowship requires a willingness to carry the burdens of our brothers and sisters, and share what we have with those who are lacking.

 

Blessings from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

 

3,2,1, IGNITE

February 3, 2017

You are a special person. You are special because God says you are valuable to Him. He genuinely cares about you and what happens to you.

 

 

We are going to do something a bit different, I’m going to ask you to answer some questions and have you do some self discovery. Print these out and get your bible and learn about your unique relationship to God.

 

God created you.

God is present and knows you.

God loves you.

God adopted you into His family

 

 

BEGINNINGS. The most amazing ones flow from God’s cosmic plan and design. God Himself is infinite and amazing. Power. Knowledge. Creativity.

  1. The first chapter of the Bible tells us that God created the universe out of nothingness. Read Genesis 1:1-5 and list at least three things you notice concerning the Creation.

  1. Through what forces did God create the world? (Hebrews 11:3)

  1. Out of God’s infinite wisdom and capacity, He designed and created you. Why? (Isaiah 43:7)

  1. The dignity God gave human beings is shown by a persons uniqueness, authority, and purpose. List some ideas from Genesis 1:26-28 that indicate:

  2. The uniqueness of humankind

  1. The position or authority of humankind

  1. God’s purpose for humankind

  1. Do you like being part of God’s humankind? Why or why not?

  1. How do you respond to God as your Creator? (Revelation 4:11)

  1. In Psalm 139:1-8, David mentions several areas of his personal life that God has “searched and known.” List at least four of them. Then place a check mark by the areas you think God knows about your life.

Grace means there is nothing I can do to make God love me more, and nothing I can do to make God love me less. It means that I, even I who deserve the opposite, am invited to take my place at the table in God’s family.

—Philip Yancey,

What’s So Amazing About Grace?

  1. How did David respond as he realized that God knew him completely and that God is present everywhere? (Psalm 139:23-24)

  1. How do you feel about God’s detailed interest in you as revealed by Jesus? (Matthew 10:29-31)

  1. What was God’s greatest demonstration of His love? (1 John 4:9-10)

GOD SO LOVED THE WORLD…

WHOEVER BELIEVES IN HIM

shall not perishbut have

everlasting life

DEATH>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>LIFE

HE GAVE HIS ONLY SON JESUS

  1. Study John 3:16 in relationship to the previous illustration.

  2. What motivated God to sacrifice His Son for us?

  1. How can a person respond to Gods offer of eternal life?

Jesus offers himself as God’s doorway into the life that is truly life. Confidence in him leads us today, as in other times, to become his apprentices in eternal living. “Those who come through me will be safe,” he said. “They will go in and out and find all they need. I have come into their world that they may have life, and life to the limit.”

—Dallas Willard,

The Divine Conspiracy

  1. In John 10:9-16, Jesus uses metaphorical language by comparing His love and concern to the love and concern of a shepherd. According to this passage, what are some of the ways Jesus cares for us?

  1. Do you feel worthy to receive God’s love? Is receiving love easy for you? Why or why not?

  1. Do you think God requires you to be worthy of love or feel worthy of love before He loves you? Explain.

  1. How do you feel about addressing God as Jesus described in Matthew 6:9?

  1. Is it true that God is everyone’s Father? Why or why not? (John 8:42-44)

  1. How is one born into God’s family? (John 1:12-13)

The importance of the assurance of faith lies in the fact that, childlike, I cannot possibly love or serve God if I do not know whether he loves and acknowledges me as his child.

—Andrew Murray, The New Life

  1. From Romans 8:15-17 what are some blessings of being adopted as a true child of God? From these blessings circle the one that touches your heart most.

Finish this comparison:

Being born into God’s family is like…

  1. Describe briefly where you are in the journey of knowing God as your Father (Abba is a personal name for father).

It is important for you as a follower of Jesus to be assured that God is your Father and that you have eternal life. Although emotions are important in any relationship, they can change for many reasons. So our assurance of being in God’s family must ultimately depend on the word of God, who is trustworthy and keeps His promises. “I write these things to you who believe… that you may know that you have eternal life” (1 John 5:13).

The following verses have helped many gain this assurance. Consider memorizing one of them to strengthen your assurance.

“I tell you the truth, whoever hears my word and believes him who sent me has eternal life and will not be condemned; he has crossed over from death to life.” (John 5:24)

And this is the testimony: God has given us eternal life, and this life is in his Son. He who has the Son has life; he who does not have the Son of God does not have life. (1 John 5:11-12)

“Here I am! I stand at the door and knock. If anyone hears my voice and opens the door, I will come in and eat with him, and he with me.” (Revelation 3:20)

I sincerely helps new and young believers to grow and for the “been around long” group to get reignited

Blessings from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

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