THE CROSS

January 15, 2018

The Cross of Jesus Christ exposes me before the eyes of other people, informing them of the depth of my depravity. If I wanted others to think highly of me, I would conceal the fact that a shameful slaughter of the perfect Son of God was required that I might be saved. But when I stand at the foot of the Cross and am seen by others under the light of that Cross, I am left uncomfortably exposed before their eyes. Indeed, the most humiliating gossip that could ever be whispered about me is blared from Golgotha’s hill; and my self-righteous reputation is left in ruins in the wake of its revelations. With the worst facts about me thus exposed to the view of others, I find myself feeling that I truly have nothing left to hide.

Thankfully, the more exposed I see that I am by the Cross, the more I find myself opening up to others about ongoing issues of sin in my life. (Why would anyone be shocked to hear of my struggles with past and present sin when the Cross already told them I am a desperately sinful person?) And the more open I am in confessing my sins to fellow-Christians, the more I enjoy the healing of the Lord in response to their grace -filled counsel and prayers.  Experiencing richer levels of Christ’s love in companionship with such saints, I give thanks for the gospel’s role in forcing my hand toward self-disclosure and the freedom that follows.

Scriptures used for the above conclusions, (our action plan, to read and know the scripture, to practice and believe and apply them to our thinking).

 Golgotha was the place where Jesus was crucified. John 19.” … and He went out, bearing His own cross, to the place called the Place of a Skull, which is called in Hebrew, Golgotha. (18) There they crucified Him . . . . ” James 5:16. “Therefore, confess your sins to one another, and pray for one another so that you may be healed. . . . .” Ephesians 3. “( 14) For this reason I bow my knees before the Father, . . . (17) . . . that you, being rooted and grounded in love, (18) may be able to comprehend Ephesians 1:4. “. . . He chose us in Him before the foundation of the world, that we should be holy and without blame before Him in love,” (NKJV)

God bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

Praise report from Olivia, her health has been really good now for over a year, she’s gone from bedridden most days for weeks at a time to healthy productive, happy and married. God bless

 

God created the inside you

January 13, 2018

Moses was the most famously reluctant public speaker in history. When God called him to be the Israelites’ spokesman before Pharaoh, Moses protested that he wasn’t a good fit for the job because he had “never been eloquent” and was “slow of speech and tongue” (Ex 4:10).

 In Exodus 6:12 we find him once again making excuses for his lack of ability: “If the Israelites will not listen to me, why would Pharaoh listen to me, since I speak with faltering lips?” The more literal translation is, “My lips are uncircumcised.” Moses was not saying he had a speech impediment (“faltering lips”), but rather that he was “not ready for public speaking,” using the metaphorical language of circumcision. More precisely, he was claiming he didn’t have the temperament necessary to be the voice of the Israelites.

 Temperament is the combination of mental, physical and emotional traits that make up our natural predisposition. Like Moses, we all have natural abilities and inclinations that can affect how we respond to God’s calling. We might even, like Moses, use our temperament as an excuse to avoid following where God is leading.

 Because temperament can affect our obedience, both positively and negatively, it’s an area worth considering in more detail. Here are four key truths to keep in mind:

  1. Temperament is part of God’s design—For all of history, humans have attempted to understand and explain our natural dispositions. The Greco-Roman world identified four temperaments (sanguine, choleric, melancholic and phlegmatic), thought to correspond with the four distinct bodily fluids (black bile, yellow bile, phlegm and blood). Today, psychologists tend to rely on personality tests rather than body fluids when identifying temperaments.

 While some terms used to describe temperament (e.g., introversion and extroversion) can serve as helpful classifications  we don’t have to fully subscribe to any particular theory of temperament to recognize that temperaments and personality types are part of God’s design.

  1. Temperament is not a sin, though it can be affected by sin—As with everything else in creation, sin has tainted our dispositions and proclivities. But our unique temperament is amoral and not necessarily sinful. “Some people are ‘cold’ by temperament,” said C. S. Lewis, “that may be a misfortune for them, but it is no more a sin than having a bad digestion is a sin; and it does not cut them out from the chance, or excuse them from the duty, of learning charity.”

  1. Temperament is not who you are—“Your temperament reveals the values that you most naturally hold. “They were given to you (like your body, talents, and intelligence were given to you) to be stewarded for a purpose.”

  1. When, like Moses, we define ourselves by our temperament, we can forget they were given by God to be stewarded for his purposes. This can lead, to pride or insecurity: “Both pride and insecurity begin to use God’s gift as a reason why we are the exception to God’s rules.”

  1. Temperament must be tempered by obedience—Our natural dispositions might make some spiritual disciplines easier and others more difficult. For example, the person who is “cold by temperament” might find it difficult to generate the emotions of charity. But that doesn’t negate the requirement to love our neighbor. It also doesn’t require that we manufacture emotions we don’t feel. “Do not waste time bothering whether you ‘love’ your neighbor; act as if you did,” adds Lewis. “As soon as we do this we find one of the great secrets. When you are behaving as if you loved someone, you will presently come to love him.”

  Moses often attempted to convince his Creator he didn’t have the temperament necessary to carry out the tasks required of him. But despite his frequent grumbling and protestations, Moses obeyed God. In this he can serve as a model for how we, too, can set aside our natural inclinations when they conflict with the requirements of obedience.

Remember that God created you and your temperament.

God bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

 

SLOW AND STEADY

January 12, 2018

Slow and steady

  “Rest in the Lord, and wait patiently for Him; fret not thyself” (Ps. 37:7).

  Our Father moves on the basis of His finished work, therefore hurry is not a factor with Him nor should it be with us. We are to ‘walk in the Spirit,’ and the blessed Holy Spirit will see to it that we obtain all that our Father has for us, step by step. “The steps of a good man are ordered by the Lord, and he delighteth in His way” (Ps. 37:23). Don’t be discouraged—Enoch walked with God for three hundred years before he was translated!

We cannot become spiritual all at once; we must be content to begin as babes. Spiritual maturity and strength do not come by effort but by growth; and growth is the result of being nourished by proper food. But if we do not grow by effort it is important to remember that we do not grow without exercise.

  “God begins by giving our hearts a sense of the blessedness of the grace in which He has called us, that we may be awakened and enhungered to pursue the knowledge of all this with purpose of heart and prayerful study.

 Whatever we do accurately must take time and collectedness of mind, and there is no accuracy in all the world like keeping company with God, and yet nothing so free from bondage or tediousness. By going slow with the Lord we accomplish more than by going with a rush, because what we do is done so much better and does not have to be undone. It is done in a better spirit, with deeper motives, and bears fruit far out in the future, when all mushroom performances have been dissipated forever.

  “Delight thyself also in the Lord, and He shall give thee the desires of thine heart” (Ps. 37:4).

God bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

 

walk the walk men

January 6, 2018

A MAN OF GOD IS KNOWN BY WHAT HE FOLLOWS AFTER

While the man of God is continually running from evil, he must also be running toward good. There is a sense in which, as long as we are in this body, we can never stop running. If we stop running from what is evil, it will catch us. If we stop pursuing what is righteous, it will elude us. We will never be at the point where we have finally outdistanced what is wrong, nor will we ever have fully captured what is fight. Our whole life consists of flight and pursuit.

What specifically must a man of God pursue? In 1 Timothy 6:11 Paul lists six qualities that distinguish a man of God: righteousness, godliness, faith, love, patience, and gentleness. The first two are general virtues, one having to do with external behavior, the other with internal attitude and motivation.

Righteousness simply means doing right, both before God and before man. This is not the imputed righteousness we have in Christ through faith, but the practical righteousness of living according to the standards of God. When a man who claims to preach God’s word leads an ungodly, lascivious, ego-centered, materialistic life—a life that would make a black mark on a piece of coal—that man is not a man of God. A man of God pursues what is fight.

Godliness, on the other hand, refers to the spirit of holiness, of reverence and piety in the heart. This spirit is the source of fight behavior. It is living one’s life in the conscious presence of the holiness of God. This consciousness comes from devotion to the Word of God, prayer, self-denial, discipline, accountability, worship, communion, and all the other means God provides for bringing one’s heart captive to Christ. A man of God must not be so concerned for the welfare of his flock that he neglects his on spiritual health. If he falls short of God’s standard of holiness, his ministry cannot be effective. A man of God must tend his own garden and bring forth the fruit of godliness.

From these two general virtues flow the more specific ones named. The two internal virtues Paul mentions are faith and love. Faith means confident trust in God for everything, complete loyalty to Him, unwavering confidence in His power, purpose and provision. The man of God lives by trusting the sovereign God to keep His word and meet His servant’s needs. He lives in a kind of relaxed desperation: desperate because of the tremendous ramifications of the ministry, but relaxed because of his confidence in the sovereignty of God. He lives in faith.

Coupled with faith is love: agape love, beautiful, volitional, unrestricted and unrestrained. It is a love that includes everyone, God and men, Christians and non-Christians. The man of God understands the great commandment: you shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul, and with all your mind, and your neighbor as yourself (Matt. 22:37–39). His love for God is so deep that it overflows into love for God’s children. He loves them enough that, when necessary, he is willing to confront them with the truth.

The other virtues named may be considered outward virtues: patience and gentleness. Patience does not mean a passive resignation, but a victorious, triumphant endurance, an unswerving loyalty to the Lord in the midst of trials. This is the endurance of the martyr who will give his life for the cause, of the shepherd who will lay down his life, if need be, for his flock, just as his Master did. The man of God endures the inevitable and constant trials of ministry, not just with resignation, but with victorious joy.

Finally, the man of God must pursue gentleness, or meekness. This is the selfless attitude of one who, though consumed with a great cause, recognizes that he makes no contribution to its success. The man of God must be humble.

Righteousness, godliness, faith, love, patience, and gentleness: if a man does not pursue these virtues, but pursues the things of the world, he cannot be a man of God.

The carnal life or the walk in the spirit life. A life long battle, although age seems to help, and drop in testosterone helps as well.

God bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

 

WHAT THE HELL?

January 3, 2018

WHAT THE HELL?

Various theories on the location of hell have been put forward. A traditional view is that hell is in the center of the earth. Others propose that hell is located in outer space in a black hole. In the Old Testament, the word translated “hell” is Sheol; in the New Testament, it’s Hades (meaning “unseen”) and Gehenna (“the Valley of Hinnom”). Sheol is also translated as “pit” and “grave.” Both Sheol and Hades refer to a temporary abode of the dead before judgment (Psalm 9:17; Revelation 1:18). Gehenna refers to an eternal state of punishment for the wicked dead (Mark 9:43).

The idea that hell is below us, perhaps in the center of the earth, comes from passages such as Luke 10:15: “And thou, Capernaum, which art exalted to heaven, shalt be thrust down to hell” (KJV). Also, in 1 Samuel 28:13-15, the medium of Endor sees the spirit of Samuel “coming up out of the ground.” We should note, however, that neither of these passages is concerned with the geographic location of hell. Capernaum’s being thrust “down” is probably a reference to their being condemned rather than a physical direction. And the medium’s vision of Samuel was just that: a vision.

In the King James Version, Ephesians 4:9 says that before Jesus ascended into heaven, “he also descended . . . into the lower parts of the earth.” Some Christians take “the lower parts of the earth” as a reference to hell, where they say Jesus spent the time between His death and resurrection. However, the New International Version gives a better translation: “he also descended to the lower, earthly regions.” This verse simply says that Jesus came to earth. It’s a reference to His incarnation, not to His location after death.

The notion that hell is somewhere in outer space, possibly in a black hole, is based on the knowledge that black holes are places of great heat and pressure from which nothing, not even light, can escape. Surprisingly, this concept of hell is presented in the 1979 Walt Disney film The Black Hole. Near the movie’s end, all the characters pass through a black hole. On the other side, the villain finds himself in a fiery place of torment, while the other characters enjoy disembodied bliss. It’s interesting that a Disney movie would include a depiction of hell, but it’s best not to base our theology on movies!

Another speculation is that the earth itself will be the “lake of fire” spoken of in Revelation 20:10-15. When the earth is destroyed by fire (2 Peter 3:10; Revelation 21:1), the theory goes, God will use that burning sphere as the everlasting place of torment for the ungodly. Again, this is mere speculation.

To sum up, Scripture does not tell us the geological (or cosmological) location of hell. Hell is a literal place of real torment, but we do not know where it is. Hell may have a physical location in this universe, or it may be in an entirely different “dimension.” Whatever the case, the location of hell is far less important than the need to avoid going there.

God bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

 

OCCUPY

December 30, 2017

OK, I CAN’T BELIEVE I’M GOING TO USE THIS AS A TITLE.

“OCCUPY”

  “God, who is rich in mercy, for His great love with which He loved us . . . hath made us alive together with Christ . . . and hath raised us up together, and made us sit together in heavenly places in Christ Jesus” (Eph. 2:4–6).

  Believers are not occupying their position! At best, most are trying to attain a victorious position by means of prayer, Bible study, commitment, reconsecration, surrender, and so forth. But the answer is simply to abide where we have already been placed—in our risen Lord Jesus Christ. Abide above, and keep looking down!

  “Our Father has taken us over Jordan and placed us in Canaan, but the reality of it is never known until by faith we accept the fact on the basis of having died with Christ, and that therefore heaven is our place, and we know it to be our place now; and that this side is not our place, and we know that it is not.

The more we abide in the Lord on the other side, the less disappointed we will be here, for when we are there we import new joys and new hopes into this old world, from an entirely new one, and we therefore in every way surpass the inhabitants of this lost world.

 You must abide in Christ in heaven before you can descend with heavenly ability to act for Him down here. The great secret of all blessing is to come from the Lord. Most Christians go to Him.

 Christian experience is our measure of apprehension of that which is already true of us in the Lord Jesus Christ.

  “Stand fast (occupy) in the Lord” (Phil. 4:7).

One thing I tell every struggling pastor who has problems with his sermons. “You are not spending enough time in prayer, you have to come out of the heavenly throne room and into the pulpit.”

Isaiah 6:7 He touched my mouth with it and said, “Look, this coal has touched your lips. Your evil is removed; your sin is forgiven.

God bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

Pray for Chris R, gallbladder surgery tomorrow.

Ronnie V, she celebrates 44 years sobriety today.

Bill F, 98 years young, tomorrow we are going trike riding.

 

The Crown

December 27, 2017

  “The God of all grace, who hath called us unto His eternal glory by Christ Jesus, after ye have suffered awhile, make you perfect (mature), establish, strengthen, settle you” (1 Pet. 5:10).

  At first, the old nature hides from us. Then, we try to hide from it. But when we begin to grow in grace and in the knowledge of the Lord Jesus, we are able to face up to the awful facts concerning the old man and his condemnation at the Cross. As the Holy Spirit reveals the old man (Col. 3:9), we count upon death; as He reveals the new man (Col. 3:10), we count upon life (Rom. 6:11).

The believer, at the opening of his new course of life, never knows his own heart; indeed, he could not bear the full knowledge of it; he would be overwhelmed thereby. He graciously leads us by a circuitous route, like Moses in the wilderness, we are on a journey of self discovery. And because of His grace we are led slowly into the understanding of how great our sin and fallen nature as corrupted, in order that our apprehension of His grace may keep pace with our growing self-knowledge.

It was not for nothing that God let Satan loose upon His dear servant, Job. God loved Job with a perfect love; a love that could take account of everything, and, looking below the surface, could see the deep moral roots in the heart of His servant—roots which Job had never seen, and, therefore, never judged. What a mercy to have to do with such a God!

To be in the hands of One who will spare no pains in order to subdue everything in us which is contrary to Himself, and to bring out in us His own blessed image!

  “Humble yourselves, therefore, under the mighty hand of God, that He may exalt you in due time, casting all your care upon Him; for He careth for you” (1 Pet. 5:6, 7).

We to shall wear a crown of sorrows before we wear a crown of joy. Like Job we will all be tested, bear up under it because it is the mark of kinship with Christ.

God bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

Thank you with all my heart those that comment,, hit the like button and pray. Thank you for all the bibles donated for our bible quizzes.

We have so many people emailing to be put on our prayer list, sometimes I can’t list them all. We had one guy that drove over 900 miles to hand us his prayer request, so he could be prayed over before surgery. I wept so deeply that this guy was so disconnected from any sort of community. God not only healed him but blessed him with a new heart and he is getting “plugged in” here in our little town. He’s now the unofficial greeter at Denny’s, handing out tracts and bibles and asking people if they need prayer.

God bless you all so much.

BABLE

December 22, 2017

Babylon, Babbel, Nutz,

In Dr. James Kennedy’s book; ‘Evangelism Explosion’ he wrote one thing that is often overlooked in talking to people about Christ, especially people in cults,(although now days I would apply this rule to everyone you talk to since we are so multicultural and pluralistic these days).

The rule was this; you have to agree what words mean. For example you just can’t start out a conversation and ask someone “is Jesus Lord of your life” and expect an answer that is mutually understandable to both parties. An agreement has to be reached that each word in that statement has the same meaning to each party.

This also important as we talk to other believers; we need to ask them what their theology allows them to believe, so we know that we are really talking about the same thing or even if both parties know what the other party is talking about.

Let me give you an example of what I’m talking about; my Bachelor of Science was in New Testament languages and theology (double major) from a Reformed Theological viewpoint, my masters was in theology was from a Brethren seminary, my M.Div., was in counseling psychology were I went for clinical work at a very Freudian institute but also continued at the Brethren seminary; my doctorate was in the Psychology of Counseling from an Evangelical college that was mostly Dutch Reformed.

But the whole time I am a preacher in a Pentecostal Church or working with Oral Roberts.

Sorry to make you wade through all that; the point is that I realize I speak in Pentecostalese. (that one does not make it through spell check).

So here’s the reason for this devotion, twice now for devotions we’ve talked about ‘secret sins’ and twice now in Christian dialogue with born again believers that have never had any association with Pentecost, they have never heard the term used before, and like the devotion pointed out they knew that there could not be such a thing as secret sin, as God knows all.

So I had to explain to both these mature in the Lord, brothers and sisters that the Pentecostal movement is filled with very poor theological constructs that are used to often make the church toxic, controlling and yes even cult like. Add to that Arminian Theology (you can lose your salvation).

And that is one of the things that I have fought against in trying to make the movement more scripturally based and less experientially based. (good luck with that, it’s not always gladly accepted, as feel good often out sells knowledge and soundness of doctrine). And since that has spread to all these independent non Pentecostal churches, where Jesus is like a warm blanket fresh out of the dryer, or God has to do what you say faith speaking nonsense.

So in our conversation between believers (Christians of other denominations) let’s make sure we are using the right words and agree to what our words mean, in order to express ourselves or it will be the Tower of Babel between the brethren.

God bless

Drop us note at scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

Pray for Denise H. newly married (3 months) and she isn’t sure it wasn’t just about the sex. (where’s the love).

Pray for Abbey, 38 years old and a snow boarding freak, fell and fractured her hip and no one saw her go down. She was praying out loud and

A cross country skier heard her and found her, and it turns out he’s an EMT. Praise God for that.

Ok,, bible quiz and bible give away. What country has killed and eaten more missionaries than any other country? \\

Weird questions right, you can choose a large print KJV or a compact NIV study bible. Just email the answer to scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

the long road

December 12, 2017

Why me? Why now? What is God doing? Suffering is a tool God uses to get our attention and to accomplish His purposes in our lives. It is designed to build our trust in the Almighty, but suffering requires the right response if it is to be successful in accomplishing God’s purposes. Suffering forces us to turn from trust in our own resources to living by faith in God’s resources.

Suffering is not in itself virtuous, nor is it a sign of holiness. It is also not a means of gaining points with God, or of subduing the flesh (as in asceticism). When it is possible, suffering is to be avoided. Christ avoided suffering unless it meant acting in disobedience to the Father’s will.

“In the day of prosperity be happy, But in the day of adversity consider—God has made the one as well as the other so that man may not discover anything that will be after him” (Eccl. 7:14)

All suffering is not, for instance, a product of our own foolishness, self-induced misery, or sin. It is true, however, that rarely does suffering not reveal areas of need, areas of weakness, and wrong attitudes that need to be removed like dross in the gold-refining process (cf. 1 Pet. 1:6-7).

In this you greatly rejoice, even though now for a little while, if necessary, you have been distressed by various trials, that the proof of your faith, being more precious than gold which is perishable, even though tested by fire, may be found to result in praise and glory and honor at the revelation of Jesus Christ; (1 Peter 1:6-7)

No matter the reason, even if it is not God’s discipline for blatant carnality, it is a purifier for none of us will ever be perfect in this life.

Philippians 3:12-14 12 Not that I have already obtained it, or have already become perfect, but I press on in order that I may lay hold of that for which also I was laid hold of by Christ Jesus. 13 Brethren, I do not regard myself as having laid hold of it yet; but one thing I do: forgetting what lies behind and reaching forward to what lies ahead, 14 I press on toward the goal for the prize of the upward call of God in Christ Jesus.

The question we must each face is not, ‘if’ we are going to have trials in life, but how will we respond to them?

1 Thessalonians 3:3 so that no man may be disturbed by these afflictions; for you yourselves know that we have been destined for this.

1 Peter 4:19 Therefore, let those also who suffer according to the will of God entrust their souls to a faithful Creator in doing what is right.

Suffering itself is not the thing that produces faith or maturity. It is only a tool that God uses to bring us to Himself so we will respond to Him and His Word. It forces us to turn from trust in our own resources to living by faith in God’s resources. It causes us to put first things first. Ultimately, it is the Word and the Spirit of God that produces faith and mature Christlike character (Ps. 119:67, 71).

talk to God, talk to a friend, get counseling, change doctors, don’t give up, express your self, be honest with your self, cry, there is a place a time when you will find yourself closer to God.

and most of all find a reason to laugh.

God bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

 

 

 

INCOMPARABLE

December 5, 2017

INCOMPARABLE GAIN

“But what things were gain to me, those I counted loss for Christ” (Phil. 3:7).

As far as our Father is concerned, the early and middle years of the Christian life have to do primarily with our spiritual development. Maturity must underlie all abiding effectiveness. Most of our service during this time is learning how not to do it.

“Incalculable harm has been done to the deeper spirituality of the Church, by the idea that when once we are saved the using of the gifts in His service follows as a matter of course. No; for this there is indeed needed very special grace. And the way in which the grace comes is again that of sacrifice and surrender. We must see how all our gifts and powers are, even though we be children of God, still defiled by sin, and under the power of the old nature. We must feel that we cannot at once proceed to use them for God’s glory. We must first lay them at Christ’s feet, to be accepted and cleansed by Him.

We must feel ourselves utterly powerless to use them aright. We must see that they are most dangerous to us, because through them the flesh, the old nature, will so easily exert its power. In this conviction we must part with them, giving them entirely to the Lord. When He has accepted them, and set His stamp upon them, we receive them back, to hold them as His property, to wait on Him for the grace to daily use them aright, and to have them act only under His influence.

Above all the difficulty which Paul had to meet in his care of the churches, that which arose from our disposition to return to the law, or to ‘confidence in the flesh,’ was the most frequent and the greatest.

“I count all things but loss for the excellency of the knowledge of Christ Jesus, my Lord” (Phil. 3:8).

God bless from scumlikeuschurch@gmail.com

Prayer for Paul C. he’s kind of off the chart and needs to get back.

Pray for Donna H, fighting the Big C, she’s 49, three kids, married and she’s tough.

Pray for Stacey, 24, pregnant, left the Marines, and she has not much in the way of family support. We met at the VA hospital, I was sitting outside and she just came over and broke down. Pray her family reconciles. (she is the second woman I’ve met there that is in the same boat, she’s also dealing with feeling guilty about not still being in the Corp.)